Kate Spade Reportedly Regretted Offloading Brand A Decade Ago

'She got a great apartment but she lost her company, her friends and her staff. She was very isolated.'

Kate Spade attends a charity event in Manhattan.
Donald Bowers / Getty Images

'She got a great apartment but she lost her company, her friends and her staff. She was very isolated.'

As family and fans continue to mourn the loss of iconic designer Kate Spade, plenty of questions still remain as to what exactly drove her to kill herself.

As the Inquisitr reported on Tuesday, the 55-year-old was found dead in her New York City apartment in what was later ruled a suicide by handing. Spade was found by her housekeeper and family has since spoken out, saying that Spade had a mental illness and was being treated for it. It was also revealed that she and her husband, Andy Spade, had been living apart for the past 10 months but they were not legally separated and had not even discussed a divorce.

“She was actively seeking help for depression and anxiety over the last 5 years, seeing a doctor on a regular basis and taking medication for both depression and anxiety. There was no substance or alcohol abuse. There were no business problems,” Andy shared.

But a new report from Radar Online shares that Kate deeply regretted selling her the iconic company that made her famous and that could have been one of the factors that led to her death. A source close to Spade said that selling her beloved company was the “biggest regret of her life.”

“That company was Kate. Her name was on everything they sold. It gave her something to do each day. It was her passion.”

As many will recall, the Spades and their investors sold 56 percent of the company to Neiman Marcus in 1999 for $36 million. In 2006, they sold off the remaining portion of the company for another $59 million. But last year, Coach acquired the popular company for in a sale for $2.4 billion. But since Kate had already fully sold the company, she did not see a penny from that sale.

“She got a great apartment but she lost her company, her friends, and her staff. She was very isolated. It would break her heart to see someone carry a bag with her name on it when she had nothing to do with the design of that purse,” the insider says.

So even though she did make a ton of money in the initial sale of the company, Kate was still “in a golden prison.” Again, it is not fully known whether or not the sale of her company was partly to blame for her shocking suicide, but the source close to Spade thinks that Kate was really troubled by the fact that she didn’t have an active role in the company that she put her blood, sweat, and tears into.

May she rest in peace.