Hot Car Death: Texas Infant Dies After Being Left In Vehicle For Hours, Dad ‘Forgot’ To Take Her To Day Care

It's not even summer yet, and already children are dying from being left in hot cars.

a baby died in a hot car in texas
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It's not even summer yet, and already children are dying from being left in hot cars.

A seven-month-old infant has died after allegedly being left in a hot car for several hours, The Evening Standard is reporting. The baby’s father says he forgot to take her to day care and instead went to work.

According to a police report, cops and emergency medical services were called to Eagle Pass High School in Eagle Pass, Texas, after receiving reports of a female infant locked inside a vehicle. The temperature outside at the time was about 98 degrees.

The baby was taken to a nearby hospital, where she was later pronounced dead, according to the police report. Police say that the baby’s father, who is a teacher at the high school, forgot to take the infant to day care and instead went straight to work, forgetting about her in the back of the vehicle. It is unclear how long she was left there.

“The Eagle Pass Police Department is currently assisting the Eagle Pass Independent School District Police Department with this ongoing investigation.”

Even though summer is officially weeks away, already children are dying from being left in hot cars. As previously reported by the Inquisitr, in Virginia, four-month-old twins were found dead after being left in a hot car for an estimated nine hours. As in the Texas case, it appears that a parent simply forgot about the child being in the vehicle after returning from work.

Similarly, according to an April Accuweather report, this year’s unusually warm spring had, at that time, already contributed to two hot car deaths — one in Miami and one in North Charleston, South Carolina.

And those are just the cases that have made national news.

As The Palestine Herald reported earlier this week, more than 700 children have died from being left in hot cars in the past 20 years – and more than 100 of those deaths have been in Texas. In fact, the Lone Star State leads the nation in hot car deaths.

Meanwhile, according to a June 2017 ABC News report, the technology industry is racing to come up with inventions that will prevent kids from being left in hot cars. One such technology would alert drivers, through a series of beeps and chimes, if a child was still in the back seat of a car after the ignition has been turned off.