America Needs A National AI Strategy, Says Intel Chief

A national strategy for AI will provide the necessary guideposts that would help the country grow.

Intel Brian Krzanich on AI
Charles Sykes / AP Images

A national strategy for AI will provide the necessary guideposts that would help the country grow.

Last month, when Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee, he admitted that the social media platform did have loopholes that resulted in the leak of 80 million user data. According to officials at Facebook, Russians weaponized the platform that had an impact on the 2016 U.S. election.

Zuckerberg promised that the company intends to focus on technologies like artificial intelligence (AI) to prevent data theft in the future. Just like Facebook, companies like Google, Apple, and Intel are also working on futuristic AI technologies.

Brian Krzanich, CEO of Intel, said that the U.S. technology sector has long been a driver of global economic growth. However, it lacks an AI strategy.

The Intel chief pointed out that countries like China, India, Japan, France, and the EU are crafting bold plans for artificial intelligence. The U.S. too should follow in their footsteps, he said.

“From the PC to the Internet, the greatest advancements of the past 50 years were spawned in the U.S. A national AI strategy can build on this history of economic and technological leadership,” he added.

Krzanich said that a national strategy for AI will provide the necessary guideposts that enable industry and academia to innovate. This, in turn, would help the country as a whole.

“When the regulatory environment is known and understood, businesses and government researchers can maximize their impact by pursuing the same goals,” he said.

Citing case studies of China and the EU, Krzanich said that the former’s plan includes measurable objectives and detailed direction on specific areas of focus, backed by significant public-private funding commitments as well as industry-government alignment on direction.

On the other hand, the EU’s strategy provides deliberate direction to avoid regulation while investing in R&D. It offers a clear focus on greater investment, preparation for socio-economic changes, and formation of an ethical and legal framework.

“Japan, India, France, and others are adopting similar strategies,” he said, suggesting the U.S should also follow suit.

He said that Intel is ready to work with the U.S. government. “AI can be history’s greatest economic engine. Governments can – and should – help make this real,” he said.