Nurse Charged With Involuntary Manslaughter In Death Of H.R. McMaster, Sr., Father Of Former Security Advisor

The nurse failed to fulfill her duties by conducting neurological checks on McMaster, Sr., which allegedly led to his death.

Nurse Gainey charged for the death of McMaster Sr.
Jacqueline Larma / AP Images

The nurse failed to fulfill her duties by conducting neurological checks on McMaster, Sr., which allegedly led to his death.

A nurse from the Cathedral Village senior living facility is facing up to 20 years in prison for failing to perform her job, which allegedly led to the death of H.R. McMaster, Sr. McMaster’s son was the former national security advisor for the Trump administration. The 30-year-old nurse, Christann Shyvin Gainey, has been charged with “neglect of a care-dependent person, involuntary manslaughter and tampering with records.”

Reports show that McMaster, Sr. fell in his room when he was alone, and staff found him on the floor with a small cut on the side of his head. Gainey should have conducted eight neurological checks, which would have prevented his death, asserted Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro. Instead, Gainey had the staff wheel McMaster, Sr. into the lobby, where he was found dead the next day on April 13, according to CNN. It’s believed that the time period between when he fell and the time of his death was a span of eight hours. McMaster, Sr. was 84-years-old when he passed away.

Not only that, Gainey then preceded to make up false paperwork to make it appear as though she had conducted the required neurological checks on McMaster, Sr. However, a review of eight hours of surveillance tapes revealed that Gainey did not conduct a single neurological check. Under normal circumastances, Gainey would be expected to conduct a “close neurological monitoring,” as well as an assessment in 15-minute increments for an hour, followed by an hourly assessment for three more hours.

Police reports revealed that an assistant nurse questioned Gainey on whether she had conducted the neurological checks. Gainey replied in the affirmative, and that, “They were fine,” according to the Washington Post. Later, police asked Gainey how she could have conducted a neurological check on McMaster, Sr. 20 minutes after his death, as indicated on her report. She admitted that, “Well, I falsified that one.”

McMaster, Sr. was only in the care of the facility for a short period of time. He was admitted on April 9 for rehabilitation after suffering a stroke. The cause of his death was announced by the medical examiner as “blunt impact head trauma.”

Gainey’s lawyer, Sharon Piper, said that Gainey is likely to plead not guilty. Meanwhile, Attorney General Shapiro believes differently.

“Gainey could have saved Mr. McMaster’s life had she simply done her job. Instead, she intentionally ignored her job responsibilities, falsified paperwork, and lied to her supervisors to cover up this inexcusable conduct.”

In addition to the police investigation into Gainey, the Pennsylvania Department of Health also conducted an inspection of the retirement center.