22 Reasons Why Trump Deserves The Nobel Peace Prize, According To Scott Adams

The 'Dilbert' cartoonist claims that people keep asking him this question.

Trump Nobel Prize North Korea
Susan Walsh / AP Images

The 'Dilbert' cartoonist claims that people keep asking him this question.

When U.S. President Donald Trump was issuing inflammatory tweets mocking the “little rocket man” and warning about unleashing fire and fury, the political and media cohort, including blue-check Twitter, seemed convinced that the world was on the verge of being plunged into nuclear war. Even among a segment of Trump supporters there is a feeling that the president’s sometimes unpresidential social media rhetoric can needlessly create feuds and polarize situations.

At least insofar as international diplomacy in Asia, the situation seems far different today with the announcement that Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un will meet face to face in Singapore on June 12 to discuss the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula and possible reunification of the two countries separated by the famous or infamous demilitarized zone (DMZ). It remains to be seen if the summit will actually lead to peaceful relations among all concerned, however.

Very early this morning, at Andrews Air Force Base, Trump welcomed home three Americans released from captivity by North Korea in a possible goodwill gesture. The three men returned to the U.S. with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

Dilbert creator Scott Adams recently took to Twitter to argue that Donald Trump deserves the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize. Separately, Adams has asserted that the country is trending toward a so-called Golden Age where most things seemed headed in a positive direction, exemplified by the possible resolution of the North Korea conflict through a “psychological” rather than a military solution.

Eighteen GOP lawmakers have already nominated Trump for the Nobel Prize. When asked about it, Trump said he is more interested in a “victory for the world.” He also quipped that “Everyone thinks [I deserve it], but I would never say it,” the Inquisitr previously reported.

Nobel Prize Medal
  Paramonov Alexander / Shutterstock

Persuasion “Trumps” Politics?

The pragmatic Adams, who says he is a non-voter who doesn’t belong to any political party or abide by any specific ideology, long predicted that Trump would win the 2016 presidential election in a landslide owing to the former New York real estate mogul’s persuasion skills.

Adams’ forecast proved accurate insofar as the Electoral College tally is concerned, which under the U.S. Constitution is decisive. Adams opines on the Trump administration and current events on his daily Periscope broadcast called “Coffee with Scott Adams.”

In an initial series of blog posts by the apolitical cartoonist and author, Adams wrote that Trump had skills that no other candidate in either party possessed. Adams likened Trump to a 3D chess master (while everyone else is playing at best 2D) who is also a master of negotiation, persuasion, and of the “linguistic kill shot.”

On the other hand, Scott Adams has given Trump an “F” grade for his handling of race relations since taking office.

In a tweet sent out in a run-up to the Kim Jong Un meeting announcement, Scott Adams outlined a list of 15 items (which he later revised up to 22), for why Trump should be awarded the peace prize. Among them includes the following.

  • His “America First ” approach provided credibility that the United States has no desire for regime change.
  • Used Syria for missile target practice just in case Kim thought we like to save ammo.
  • Got the U.N. to agree on sanctions.
  • Offered no concessions prior to a satisfactory agreement.
  • Used good-cop/bad cop persuasion with [South Korean President] Moon expertly playing his part.
  • President Trump’s taunt-tweets were personal message to Kim, which had the effect of treating him like a peer and humanizing the situation in a way we’ve never seen.

In a companion Periscope monologue and blog post, Adams claimed that Trump’s reputation as a dealmaker set the table for the upcoming Singapore meeting. The president’s good working relationships with the leaders of South Korea, Japan, and China (even though in the latter case, the two countries disagree on how to resolve the massive trade imbalance) factored into the upcoming meeting with Kim Jong Un, as did Trump’s unpredictability, Adams also insisted, among other things.

Based on the persuasion filter, Scott Adams remarked that agreeing to a Singapore sit-down rather than at the DMZ was a plus.

On Tuesday as anticipated, President Trump withdrew from the Iran nuclear deal as he promised to do during the campaign and vowed to reapply economic sanctions, pending negotiations for a better deal. As a candidate and as president, Trump described the deal as a disaster for the U.S. and the region because of its many concessions and accused the Tehran government of cheating

The July 2015 international agreement, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, was one of Barack Obama’s legacy achievements while in office. President Obama did not submit the agreement to the U.S. Senate for ratification in the form of a treaty, however, which would have made it binding if the votes were there.

Scott Adams has implied that a favorable outcome could emerge from exiting the deal, despite opposition to Trump’s decision from the international community and officials from the Obama administration, including the ex-president himself, and many Democratic elected officials. Iran obviously condemned Trump’s decision to withdraw, but it won praise from Israel, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Bahrain.

Obama received the Nobel Peace Prize in October 2009, in part for creating “a new climate in international politics” and giving the world “hope for a better future.”

The U.S. has designated both North Korea and Iran as state sponsors of terrorism.