George Zimmerman Arrested For Aggravated Stalking, Referenced Trayvon Martin In His Threats

George Zimmerman rose to infamy when he shot and killed Trayvon Martin on February 26, 2012.

George Zimmerman arrested in Florida for stalking
Seminole County Sheriff's Office / Getty Images

George Zimmerman rose to infamy when he shot and killed Trayvon Martin on February 26, 2012.

George Zimmerman, whose murder of Trayvon Martin helped him enter the American pop culture lexicon, has been arrested and charged with aggravated stalking.

According to Click Orlando, George Zimmerman sent several threats to a private investigator, including one threat where he referenced Trayvon Martin and another where he threatened to feed the investigator to an alligator.

Dennis Warren, the private investigator, alleges that Zimmerman phoned him 55 times, left 36 voicemails, texted 67 times, and sent 27 emails in a nine-day span.

Warren, who was hired by a production company called The Cinemart, was investigating Zimmerman for a Trayvon Martin documentary.

On September 21, 2017, Warren claims that he phoned Zimmerman and left him a voicemail, requesting to speak to him for the documentary. Warren claims that this was the only contact he initiated with Zimmerman and that the rest of the contact that George Zimmerman initiated in response to this voicemail was unwanted and unwarranted.

Warren also claims that Zimmerman first initiated contact with the production company for the Martin documentary on December 13, 2017, after Warren made contact with one of Zimmerman’s family members. Zimmerman’s first threatening correspondence came via text message.

“Dennis is an (expletive) who bothered my uncle in his home. Local or former law officer, he’s well on his way to the inside of a gator as well. 10-4?”

When the producer didn’t respond, George Zimmerman went on to send the producer more threatening messages, such as “answer your phone, b—h,” and “I’ll see you before you know it.” He also referenced Trayvon Martin in one of his threats, claiming that he “knows how to handle people who f*ck with me, and have since February 2012.”

Trayvon Martin was shot and killed on February 26, 2012, and it was Zimmerman’s delayed arrest and subsequent acquittal for Martin’s murder that spurned the creation of the Black Lives Matter movement.

A police officer visited George Zimmerman on the same day that he initiated contact with the producer for the Trayvon Martin documentary, and was asked by the police officer to stop.

Zimmerman’s response? “No.”

Zimmerman then went on to berate the police officer, calling her a “wh**e” and other swear words. Amazingly, he wasn’t arrested for the verbal abuse against a police officer.

Zimmerman then went on to leave the producer so many voicemails that his inbox filled up, and each voicemail got progressively more threatening.

It’s unclear what the final impetus for George Zimmerman’s arrest was, but he was finally apprehended and charged. The Seminole County Sheriff’s Office submitted its report on the case to the state attorney’s office on March 14.

George Zimmerman was released after his arrest and he is scheduled to appear in court to answer his charges on May 30.