James Comey’s Book ‘A Higher Loyalty’ To Drop This Week, Here Are Some Of The More Damning Allegations

There is, of course, the supposed 'pee tape,' but there are other allegations in Comey’s salacious White House exposé.

james comey's book about trump will have some salacious allegations
Evan Vucci / Andrew Harnik / AP Images

There is, of course, the supposed 'pee tape,' but there are other allegations in Comey’s salacious White House exposé.

Former FBI Director James Comey’s book, A Higher Loyalty, “drops” (as they say in the publishing industry) this week – specifically, tomorrow, April 17. And the book promises to be a damning look at the Trump White House from the perspective of a man who was fired by the 45th president. Some portions of the book have already been released to the media, and here now, courtesy of CNN, are four of the more salacious revelations in the book.

The Supposed “Pee Tape”

Although James Comey is not the first person to make the allegation, he’s certainly one of the most prominent. Supposedly, the story goes, Trump was in Moscow in 2013 when he was made aware that he was in the same room in which former President Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, had once spent the night. Wanting to see the bed “defiled,” Russian prostitutes were brought in to urinate on that bed. Supposedly a tape exists of that event, according to The Washington Post, although that has yet to be proven.

Comey, for his part, isn’t convinced it’s real, but he did admit to ABC’s George Stephanopoulos that it’s possible such a tape exists.

Comparisons To A “Mob Boss”

Comey is not the first to make such an allegation, but he is definitely not afraid to repeat it: Donald Trump runs his White House like a so-called “Mob Boss.” Specifically, he demands “loyalty oaths” from his subordinates. He expects his subordinates to cover for him at all costs, even if it means lying for him and then all must defer to the boss.

Further, Comey claims no one should ever hint that he or she is stronger, more powerful, or tougher than the boss – that is, Trump. Everyone in Trump’s employ must act as if Trump is the strongest and toughest person in the room.

The John Kelly Debacle

Former Marine Corps General John Kelly was brought into Trump’s White House as Chief of Staff in July 2017, not long after the firing of Reince Priebus, supposedly with the hope of bringing his military sensibility to a chaotic Oval Office.

Whether or not that plan has worked out is a matter of dispute, according to Comey.

Specifically, Comey claims, Kelly was so upset about Comey’s firing that he (Kelly) planned to quit in protest – though obviously he never did. Further, Kelly is, at best, frustrated by working around such “dishonorable” people. However, Comey claims that he (Comey) urged Kelly to stay on, for the good of the country.

Undermining Public Confidence In Law Enforcement

Trump is no fan of the law enforcement community at the federal level, says Comey. Specifically, Comey says, Trump is no fan of the FBI, which is investigating supposed Russian interference in the 2016 election, or the Justice Department. Comey does not approve.

“It is also wrong to stand idly by, or worse, to stay silent when you know better, while a president brazenly seeks to undermine public confidence in law enforcement institutions that were established to keep our leaders in check.”

The Republican Response

Republicans and the Trump administration have been trying to discredit Comey in advance of the book’s release, according to an April 13 CNN report. Specifically, both the White House and Congress have been attempting to paint Comey as a partisan who declined to prosecute Hillary Clinton in the face of “overwhelming” evidence of crimes.

The hope, says CNN writer Josh Campbell, is that discrediting Comey will discredit the FBI as a whole, in essence weakening the investigation of special counsel Robert Mueller into suspected collusion by the Trump campaign and Russian operatives to interfere with the 2016 election.