Documentary Revisits Old Theory In Teresa Halbach Killing

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A new true-crime documentary series due to air in April will explore an old theory that a serial killer killed Teresa Halbach in 2005, not Steven Avery, the Manitowoc, Wisconsin, subject of Making a Murderer.

The series, It Was Him: The Many Murders of Ed Edwards, debuts at 9 p.m. April 16 on the Paramount Network, the cable TV channel formerly known as Spike. It is based on research of veteran detective John Cameron, who claims Edward Wayne Edwards is Halbach’s killer.

Cameron has appeared in several YouTube videos about the theory that Edwards killed Halbach. He claims the way Halbach was killed falls in line with Edwards’ other victims. Cameron claims Edwards was known for framing innocent people for the crimes.

For the upcoming project, Cameron worked with Wayne Wolfe, Edwards’ grandson, the Journal Sentinel reports. The two follow some of the country’s most prolific murders dating back 60 years. In addition to the Halbach case, It Was Him explores a connection between Edwards and the killings of JonBenet Ramsey, Laci Peterson, Black Dahlia, and the Zodiac Killings that perplexed California law enforcement official in the 1960s and ’70s.

One element of the alleged Edwards-Halbach theory is the claim that Edwards knew of Avery because of his 2003 exoneration. Avery had received considerable media attention after serving 18 years in prison for a 1985 rape he didn’t commit.

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According to the theories that Edwards was the killer and not Avery, Edwards kept tabs on Avery’s interactions with Steven Avery, for which Halbach took pictures as a photographer with AutoTrader magazine. Edwards killed Halbach, burned her body, then planted her remains on Avery’s property, Cameron claims.

There were also notes sent to police, some that appeared to be slightly encrypted like the letters in the Zodiac case. Edwards also had ties to Wisconsin, Cameron notes. In 2010, he pleaded guilty to the 1980 slayings of Tim Hack and Kelly Drew, high school sweethearts from the city of Fort Atkinson.

Edwards was arrested in 2009 and found guilty of five other killings over a 20-year period. In addition to the Fort Atkinson murders, he killed three people in Ohio, two in 1977 and another in 1996.

Some say Edwards may have killed two people in Oregon in 1960, and possibly 15 more in random cities. He died at the Corrections Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio, in April 2011, just months before his scheduled execution.