Logan Paul’s Manager Accused Of Paying YouTube Account To Leak Shane Dawson Pedophile Story

But Shane says he doesn't believe it.

A side by side composit photo of Youtubers Shane Dawson and Logan Paul
Valerie Macon, Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

But Shane says he doesn't believe it.

Logan Paul and Shane Dawson’s ongoing drama just got a whole lot more intriguing. PopBlast, the YouTube account that broke the story about Shane Dawson allegedly advocating pedophilia, claims that Logan Paul’s manager paid them to do so. According to Metro, the site posted a video on YouTube called “Receipts” which contained a screenshot of a Paypal receipt for $6,500. In the screenshot, you can see the name Jeffrey Levin, which is the name of Logan Paul’s manager.

Last week, Pop Blast uploaded a video entitled “Shane Dawson Is A Pedophile,” but later renamed it to “I Think Shane Dawson Is A Pedophile.” The video consisted of spliced together clips of old from Shane Dawson’s podcast in which he seems to be making a pro-pedophilia stance. In the video, you can hear Dawson appear to talk about googling naked babies and finding a 6-year-old sexy, Metro reports.

The Pop Blast channel had become known for posting videos about conspiracies centering around popular YouTubers. According to Polygon, in the time between the posting of the first video and the eventual deletion of the channel by YouTube, Pop Blast uploaded multiple videos about Shane which accused him of stealing content from other video creators, among other things.

Shane Dawson has publicly said, via his Twitter page, that he doesn’t believe that Logan Paul’s team had anything to do with the video leak. Dawson added that he believes someone is trying to manufacture a conspiracy about him and that the entire story feels “scripted.”

As for Logan Paul, The Blast reports that he was recently seen at the Tao Nightclub with friends as he continues to deal with the backlash of including the body of a Japanese suicide victim in one of his videos. But a YouTube executive has hinted that all may not be lost for one of its most popular content creators.

During the Television Critics Association’s winter press tour, Robert Kyncl, the Chief Business Officer at YouTube, sounded like he was sympathetic to Paul.

“We believe he’s made missteps, unfortunate missteps. He’s expressed remorse very quickly and is learning from the experience. Actions should speak louder than words. Logan has the opportunity to prove that,” he said.

Kyncl was non-committal on whether Logan’s stalled projects with YouTube will ever see the light of day, however.

The video, filmed by Paul in Japan’s infamous “Suicide Forest,” resulted in his channel’s removal from Google’s Preferred Channels Program, which cuts Logan off from the advertising dollars that are behind most of the platform’s top earners, The Blast reports. But given his subscriber count, which currently stands at almost 16 million users, it seems too early to say that his vlogging career is over just yet.