Video: Sarah Sanders, ‘I’m Not Done!’ — Jim Acosta, Others Argue Over Fake News At White House Press Briefing

Win McNameeGetty Images

Sarah Sanders got into quite a heated exchange with reporters at the White House on Monday, December 11, when the topic of “fake news” arose. Previously, President Donald Trump posted photos on Twitter of his rally crowd in Pensacola, Florida, along with claims that a reporter tried to mislead his readers into thinking Trump had a smaller crowd than he did. Dave Weigel of The Washington Post was at the center of the controversy and as seen below, Weigel apologized and deleted the tweet in question. Dave wrote that he was confused by the fact that Trump could be seen walking into the arena in at least one of the photos, which would prove that Trump was at least in the building when the photo was snapped, even if Trump hadn’t yet begun speaking at the podium.

As reported by Heavy, Sanders insisted on taking only one question from each journalist — a notion that Sarah stuck with throughout the press conference. However, Sanders seemed to lose her steely resolve when CNN’s Jim Acosta asked Sarah a second question. Sanders hit back against media reports that Sarah claimed were created knowingly as false reports. Reporters in the room appeared just as frustrated, with one asking Sanders if she was speaking about President Trump when she talked about purveyors of false reports.

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Watch the video of Acosta and Sanders getting into a disagreement.

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Trump’s tweet, which included the Twitter handles @DaveWeigel and the @WashingtonPost, can be seen next, with Trump accusing both of publishing a “phony photo of an empty arena hours before” he arrived at the venue. However, Weigel took issue with the fact that Trump wrote the photo was taken hours prior to his arrival, when Trump appears to be walking into the arena on the bottom right-hand side of one photo.

Some folks have drawn a red arrow on their versions of the photo.

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Sanders claimed that a “number of outlets have had to retract and change and rewrite and make editor’s notes to stories.” Acosta noted that some reporters make honest mistakes, but such mistakes do not make the journalists akin to “fake news.” Sanders next argued that writers should own up to their mistakes and when Acosta said Weigel did cop to his error, Sanders told Acosta she “wasn’t finished.” When Acosta attempted to ask about President Trump’s sexual assault allegations, Sanders noted that she was moving on to other reporters.

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