Wish.com Ad For Plus-Size Stockings Draws Fire

Evgeny KabardinShutterstock

There’s an ad on Wish.com that has been getting much more attention than a product page showing off stocking normally would garner. As of this writing, the ad is hawking “HOT Super Elastic Ultra Thin Nylon Silk Magical Stockings 3D,” but the photo of a thin model stretching stockings around her torso with her arms has also appeared on other Wish.com pages. One ad displays nude or beige stockings while another ad shows a model stretching black stockings around her body on Wish.com.

In fact, Wish.com isn’t the only website using the photo. On eBay, the same photo appears on ads for “Unbranded Silk Patternless Tights for Women.” However, those specific ads didn’t seem to come under fire, because they didn’t include the words “plus size” in the advertisements. As seen in the below Twitter Moment about the controversy, the problem emerged when the photos used in the ads were used to sell ads to “plus size” women. The backlash from Twitter users featured people asking why actual plus-sized models weren’t used to sell the stockings in the ads.

However, others are recognizing that the photos likely were stock photos used for several different ads, not just plus size ads.

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As seen in the above tweets, most of the controversy surrounding the ads calls the Wish.com ad offensive for showing just how widely a thin woman can stretch stockings around her body.

As reported by the Independent, there are some folks who are writing about their outrage over the variety of photos circulating that tend to show the same theme: women wearing stockings and tights with their hands inside the waistbands and stretching the stockings wide around their bodies. In one particular ad, a woman wears black stockings but has both of her legs inside only one leg of the stockings.

Although the point of the ads may have been to show potential buyers just how thin, stretchy, and roomy the stockings might be, that message has been lost in the plus size controversy. As the buzz begins to build surrounding the ads, it’s not clear if Wish.com will remove the photos.