New Study Claims That Smelling Your Partner’s Farts Could Actually Help You To Live Longer, Find Out Why

Who knew that flatulence could be so good for your health? While most people are generally disgusted at the bodily function that comes out of people’s rear ends, there may be a reason for you to start enjoying it and stop complaining about it.

Unilad reports that a research study done by the University of Exeter uncovered a very strange truth — smelling your partner’s farts actually has health benefits. According to the Medicinal Communications Journal, the effects of the gas hydrogen sulfide, aka what comes out of your rear end when you fart, can help in fighting mitochondrial damage — which is bad for your health.

“Although hydrogen sulfide is well known as a pungent, foul-smelling gas in rotten eggs and flatulence, it is naturally produced in the body and could in fact be a healthcare hero,” University of Exeter researcher Mark Wood claims.

Believe it or not, the very same gas in farts can help to prevent a ton of serious diseases including cancer, stroke, and even heart attack. Further research shows that inhaling these gases can also aid in preventing both arthritis and dementia.

The Exeter reports that the University of Exeter made a AP39 compound, which is basically like hydrogen sulfide, that can be used in future therapies by targeting small amounts of the substance inside cells.

Research done by the school has already proven that AP39 protects mitochondria, which is also know as the “powerhouse” of cells. The mitochondria drives energy production in blood vessel cells so when the AP39 compound is able to protect it from being damaged, your body will protect you from a ton of deadly diseases.

“Although hydrogen sulfide is well known as a pungent, foul-smelling gas in rotten eggs and flatulence, it is naturally produced in the body and could in fact be a healthcare hero with significant implications for future therapies for a variety of diseases,” Dr. Mark Wood says.

In 80 percent of studies where AP39 was administered in cardiovascular diseases, the powerhouse mitochondria cells survived and, in turn, protected the body. The AP39 compound can also lower blood pressure and help to slow down the heartbeat, which will reduce the risk of a heart attack.

A follow up study was done in collaboration with the University of Texas medical branch, further proving that the AP39 compound helped to prevent mitochondrial DNA in mitochondria. The Exeter explains that once the DNA is damaged, it is unable to be repaired and thus makes humans more susceptible to other diseases.

All of the research is still in the very beginning stages, but the University of Exeter hopes to begin to do testing on humans next.

[Featured Image by Vadim Ghirda/AP Images]