As 3,000 Cargo Containers Full Of Supplies Sit In San Juan, Trump Having Hurricane Katrina Moment, Say Critics

The attached iconic photo of former President George W. Bush peering out of the window of Air Force One as the plane flew over the devastated New Orleans region in the wake of Hurricane Katrina on Wednesday, August 31, 2005, has become a symbol. However, instead of becoming a good symbol of Bush inspecting damage from Hurricane Katrina, it became a low-point symbol of Bush’s presidency due to the interpretation of the moment being too little, too late to help those who suffered and died from the ravages of the storm while waiting for presidential help.

As reported by NPR, Bush next told FEMA Director Michael Brown, “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job.” Brown quit 10 days later amid the backlash. According to CNN, President Donald Trump might be having his own detrimental Hurricane Katrina moment in the wake of Hurricane Maria as 3,000 cargo containers full of supplies sit and wait at the Port of San Juan in Puerto Rico to be distributed. The network reports that up to 9,500 containers might be currently sitting at the port.

Crowley is one of the shipping companies that have at least 3,000 containers full of water, food, clothes, vital medicine and cars sitting and waiting to be given to folks who desperately need the items. A shortage of truck drivers and fuel, along with damaged roads and cell towers, adds to the difficulty in getting the supplies to people who are crying out for food and water.

“There are supplies and they continue to arrive. We look forward to arriving carriers to distribute.”

The below photo’s caption is translated into English, as seen above.

As seen on the Twitter page of Walter Shaub, the former Director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics, Shaub noted that Americans in Puerto Rico are desperate to get resources as the “Champagne Cabinet” of the Trump administration uses luxury planes that could be helping transport supplies to people.

Crowley has only been able to dispatch about 3 percent of the containers in San Juan. As the shipping containers sit at the port, Puerto Ricans have stood in line for hours to get the basic necessities in high temperatures.

[Featured Image by Susan Walsh/AP Images]