Poll: President Trump Seen As Dividing Country By Most Americans

Nearly two in every three Americans now see President Donald Trump as doing more to divide the country than bring it together.

A staggering 66 percent of all respondents in a new ABC News/Washington Post poll now see Trump as being more of a divider than anything else.

By comparison, just 28 percent of respondents indicated they think Trump has done more to bring the country together.

Overall, researchers found the president’s approval remains largely under water, with 57 percent of respondents saying they disapprove of the job he is doing, compared to just 39 percent that approve.

In addition, 59 percent of all respondents agreed Trump has had little impact in bringing about needed change in the nation’s capital, compared to just 39 percent who feel he has made a difference.

Even given the three-point uptick in his overall approval rating from the last time the poll was taken in July, researchers reflected Trump’s approval ratings represent the lowest score for any president at this juncture of their administration in the seven-decade history of the poll.

Pollsters also found that a dwindling number of Americans now trust Trump to handle the bubbling nuclear dispute with North Korea. Just 37 percent of respondents expressed confidence in Trump, while 62 percent indicated they have little faith in him.

A recent Gallup survey also found that more than two-thirds of all Americans don’t view Trump as being “courageous” and an even a smaller percentage find him to be “inspiring.”

The new survey on leadership concluded that just 32 percent of respondents view the president as courageous and just 28 percent say they gain inspiration from the president.

By comparison, in a poll released at the same juncture of his first term in 2009, President Barack Obama was described by 66 percent of Americans as a “strong and decisive” leader, and by 72 percent as a man “willing to make hard decisions.”

Trump recently punted on making a decision on the issue of if Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals should be allowed to remain in the U.S. over the long haul. Instead, the administration announced plans to allow DACA to unwind and for Congress to spend the next six months working to come up with a long-term solution.

[Featured Image by Spencer Platt/Getty Images]