Is The Trump Administration The Cause For D.C. Plastic Surgery Boom?

Back in the 80s, political consultant Paul Begala said that Washington was Hollywood for ugly people, but is the Trump administration having an effect on that narrative? Donald Trump has a habit of pointing out things he notices about the physical attributes in others, whether they are a political opponent or the spouse of a foreign leader. However, are all of these Trump comments having an effect on those who work in and around D.C.? The statistics say yes.

The ultimate plastic surgery commentary by President Donald Trump was when he tangled with MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski about some plastic surgery procedure she had just before the Trump presidential inauguration. But while Washington, D.C., might have taken notice that Trump took notice of who was and wasn’t having a bit of work done, people on Twitter pushed back and asked if Donald Trump also mocked his family members when they had plastic surgery.

“Dear Mr. President, when Melania has plastic surgery, do you mock her as well?”

Joanne Wolf made a joke based on the Trump rallying cry “Make America Great Again” and wondered why the first lady squints so much.

“Make America great through the miracle of plastic surgery? Who needs to see when your husband is a billionaire?”

However, the pushback from the public didn’t stop Donald Trump from mocking and sizing up the appearance of other politicians and journalists.

When Trump was on the campaign trail, the first comment of note was lobbed by Donald Trump toward Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina.

“Look at that face! Would anyone vote for that?”

But not all of Trump’s comments about appearance are negative. During a visit to Europe, he commented that the first lady of France, Madame Macron, was quite fit.

All of this talk about physical appearance is reportedly having an effect on the plastic surgery rate in the Washington, D.C., area, and some credit Trump with the bump in the rate. Minimally invasive procedures (Botox, filler, and chemical peels) are up 18 percent compared to a 3 percent growth nationwide. While the rest of the country might be comfortable talking about having a touch-up now and then, politicians around D.C. have particular needs for discretion, and so a top dermatology practice is hidden behind a beauty store.

Patients enter the practice of Dr. Noelle Sherber through a high-end boutique on 15th Street NW and are then led through a cabana and through a closed door to have a bit of Botox to smooth that furrowed brow. Dr. Sherber says that her practice has no waiting room.

“Our practice is designed for maximum privacy, so we don’t have a waiting room. If a patient is waiting for an appointment, or they’re sitting with numbing cream on, no one shares that space with them. If you have Secret Service or you need another level of discretion, we have a secret entrance that they can use so that they wouldn’t even go through the front, if need be.”

At Dr. Sherber’s practice, the most popular offerings are injectables, fillers, and lasers to treat her unique clientele, who want to look good on television but not overdone.

“In Washington, it’s not always reality that wonderful lighting and a wonderful make-up artist are available for every TV appearance. The better their skin looks, the more quickly they can appear on TV without a lot of makeup, without a lot of prep time.”

Another growth practice in Washington, D.C., is hair restoration, which no longer indicates hair plugs. As a result, the practice of Dr. Terrence Keaney is also busy.

“What’s evolved in the last decade is moving clumps of hair—now you’re moving hair from the back of the scalp up, and it activates the hair’s growth. It gives natural results. Then there’s “Platelet Rich Plasma [PRP], where we isolate out your platelets and inject them into the scalp to stimulate hair growth.”

Keaney says that even in Washington, D.C., a receding hairline indicates aging.

“A receding hair line contributes to an appearance of age, so it’s also what a lot of people mention when they come in.”

However, both doctors are noting that before Trump, the political calendar was predictable, and recesses were good times for a bit of work, but now every day is a potential “crazy day.” The August recess and Thanksgiving used to be popular, but it is harder now to sneak things in before going on a Sunday talk show thanks to the Trump administration.


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Vanity Fair said that the plastic surgery Donald Trump doesn’t want to discuss is his own. Under oath as part of their divorce, Ivana Trump, Donald Trump’s first ex-wife, discussed Donald Trump’s recovery from his own plastic surgery procedures, including alopecia reduction for his hairline and liposuction for his chin, neck, and midsection, courtesy of Dr. Steven Hoefflin.

Do you think Donald Trump is creating growth in the Washington, D.C., plastic surgery market?

[Featured Image by Mark Wilson/Getty Images]