‘Charlie Hebdo’ Hurricane Harvey Cover In English: ‘God Drowned All The Neo-Nazis Of Texas,’ 7 Hands Heil Air

Charlie Hebdo has no chill. That’s the verdict of the Internet upon seeing the latest cover of the French magazine, Charlie Hebdo, which is drawing comparisons to the types of insensitive signs that the Westboro Baptist Church might publish. With a headline that claimed, “God drowned all the neo-Nazis of Texas,” Charlie Hebdo has published a controversial cover that shows the victims of Hurricane Harvey with their hands above the water in Nazi-style salutes, Heil Hitlering some unknown figure even as they drown. There are seven hands above the water and one foot.

The reaction to Charlie Hebdo and their controversial cover is getting a bunch of backlash online since Charlie Hebdo is equating all victims of Hurricane Harvey as white supremacists. Even as victims of Hurricane Harvey are still being rescued or memorialized, the cover of Charlie Hebdo is being called insensitive, if not untrue. With claims that “God Exists! He Drowned All the Neo-Nazis of Texas,” the magazine is coming under fire so much that Charlie Hebdo is currently a trending topic on Twitter. The weekly magazine had courted controversy in the past when Charlie Hebdo printed cartoons mocking Islamic topics. In 2015, Charlie Hebdo met with tragedy when Islamist gunmen shot and killed 12 people in a terrorist attack in Paris at the Charlie Hebdo offices.

Although the Charlie Hebdo cover is meeting with plenty of backlash, some people online are still supporting the right of the publication to print what they want. Containing Nazi swastikas on flags, the controversial Charlie Hebdo cover blames the rise in alt-right beliefs as the reasoning behind the tragedy brought by Hurricane Harvey.

The sentiment expressed by Charlie Hebdo is a similar tactic that was enacted in the wake of tragedies such as the Haiti earthquake or Hurricane Katrina, when the buzz among even Christians blamed voodoo practices and other beliefs in New Orleans for the tragedy, as reported by the Chicago Tribune. Similar to the period following the tragedy on September 11, 2001, there was talk of blame about the “love of money” or other theories that caused certain people to point blame at victims. With Charlie Hebdo blaming Nazis for what happened in Texas, the publication’s viewpoint isn’t going over well on social media.

[Featured Image by Gerald Herbert/AP Images]