June 26, 2016
Sarah Palin 'Erroneously' Compares European Union To United Nations After Divisive Brexit Vote

Sarah Palin is under fire for yet another gaffe, this time over the paradoxical Brexit vote that is dogging the United Kingdom.

The former governor of Alaska joined throngs of others around the world in sharing opinions about the recent vote by Brits to leave the European Union. Palin took to her Facebook page over the weekend and extolled the UK for voting to separate from the 28-member organization.

The Donald Trump surrogate, who recently endorsed the real estate mogul and presumptive Republican nominee for the 2016 Elections, posted a picture of Margaret Thatcher with a quote from the former UK prime minister: "liberty is fundamental." Palin lauded Thatcher, who once described the EU as "the greatest folly of the modern era," according to Breitbart News Daily.

Enter the gaffe.

Amid the fervor of the shocking EU vote, Palin apparently misspoke in her comparison of the European Union to the United Nations. Arguably, the entities share little or nothing in common, according to the Daily Mail. The former is composed of 28-nation states with a focus on politics and the economy. The former body is made up of 193 nations that united along diplomatic lines in the wake of World War II. Its primary purpose is the promotion of world peace.

During her approbation on social media, Palin issued a warning to the United States to follow suit with the EU by ceding from the UN. She charged that the organization "dissolves a nation's self-determination and sovereignty."

Governor Palin praised England for being "smart" and for having the courage to declare their sovereignty from an "apocalyptic One World Government." Mother Jones called Palin's comments "insane."

Sarah Palin advised Americans to "break the shackles" from the oppressive UN and learn a lesson from its European counterparts.
"It is time to dissolve political bands that connect us to agendas, not in our best interest. May UN shackles be next on the chopping block."
Reportedly, Prime Minister Cameron, who confidently expressed doubt of passage, allowed the referendum vote to appease an anti-European Union wing of his party, according to CNBC. Fifty-one percent of voters supported separation from the confederation.

EU leaders are trying to decide how to move forward within the United Kingdom. There is growing talk that a "re-vote" is on the table. After the narrow victory of those Brits who voted "Leave," many say the vote is doing more harm than good, at least in the short-term.

The day after the historic vote that caught many political pundits and world leaders by surprise -- including Prime Minister David Cameron and President Barack Obama, global markets declined sharply on the referendum results. The British Pound fell to its lowest mark against the U.S. dollar since the '80s. The vote showed how divided the country is on issues ranging from the economy to immigration policies, particularly the recent influx of Syrian migrants into the United Kingdom and other parts of the EU.

One opponent of the rippling vote said England's vote to leave the union is not that cut and dried. She also suggested her country could put a halt to the move, despite poll results.

Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland's first minister, sat down for a political interview on Sunday about the fallout and massive economic uncertainty created in the wake of the Brexit vote. Sturgeon said she would consider asking MSP's to consider a vote to block the referendum from becoming legally binding.

"If the Scottish parliament is judging this on the basis of what's right for Scotland, then the option of saying we're not going to vote for something that's against Scotland's interests, that's got to be on the table. You're not going to vote for something that is not in Scotland's interests."
Do you support Sarah Palin's suggestion to the United States to part company with the UN?

[Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Image]