Actress Paola Saulino Allegedly Promises To Perform Oral Sex On ‘No’ Voters in Italy Referendum

Paola Saulino reportedly claims that she will live up to an alleged promise made last month to perform oral sex on those who voted “No” in Sunday’s constitutional referendum in Italy, according to media accounts.

“A STUNNING Italian actress who offered to perform a sex act on everyone who voted ‘No’ in the country’s referendum appears to be following through on her promise,” The Sun of London reported.

On her Facebook page, which is written mostly in Italian, the Los Angeles-based actress/model evidently announced that she is touring Italy next month, adding that “I am a woman of my word….Those who say NO to the referendum will be waiting in delight for my ‘Pompa Tour’ in January for what I promised to those who voted no,” The Sun detailed.

“Queues are expected to form around the block next month after an Italian glamour model offered to perform a sex act on everyone who voted No in yesterday’s referendum….Pompa is an Italian slang word for a certain sexual act and the image promoting the tour which Ms Saulino posted on Twitter showed her sucking a lollipop,” the Daily Mail explained.

Rome, Venice, and Milan are among 10 cities on Saulino’s itinerary. Those who want to take the actress up on the alleged offer must fill out a “booking form” first, however.

In a November 24 Facebook message, Paola Saulino, 27, wrote that “If am I gonna give my personal gift for your ‘No’ in the referendum? Of course!…Love you guys! I’m not kidding I just want you thank you in my personal way, I really love people who think like me.”

On Sunday, voters in Italy rejected pro-European Union, center-left prime minister Matteo Renzi’s constitutional reform referendum by voting No by a margin of 60 percent to 40 percent. Renzi made a promise of his own, to resign if the initiative failed to pass, which transformed Sunday’s balloting into a proxy vote of confidence or no confidence in his administration.

With the loss, Renzi followed up by submitting his resignation tonight, although Italy’s president asked him to hold on on until lawmakers approve a 2017 budget. “The decisive outcome, with a 70% turnout, is considered a notable victory for eurosceptic populist and nationalist parties, which campaigned heavily against Renzi and his promise to stimulate Italy’s sluggish economy,” CNN observed.

With the possibility of a general election on the horizon, the No vote is seen as a boost for pro-Trump ex-TV comedian Beppe Grillo’s populist and anti-establishment Five-Star Movement as well as the anti-immigration Northern League. In June, Five-Star candidate Virginia Raggi was elected mayor of Rome, and the party has had success in other cities as well. The Five Star Movement is among several populist and euroskeptic parties (i.e., generally opposed to excessive EU regulations and the euro itself as a common currency) gaining traction across that continent in a rejection of business-as-usual career politicians.

Renzi’s referendum loss could lead to a Brexit-style ballot measure in Italy. “If Grillo gains that power, experts believe he will scrap the euro, bring back Italy’s now defunct lira currency, and attempt to break away from the European Union,” the Legal Insurrection website observed.

“The populist movement in Italy is hard to pigeonhole in categories of left and right or conservative and liberal. In many ways, it is easier to define by what it is not rather than what it is. Italian populism sees itself as Euro-skeptic, anti-establishment (whether left or right) and anti-corruption. Italy’s Five Star Movement, the standard-bearer of Italian populism, was so-named because of the five causes it originally espoused: public water, improved transportation, sustainable development, free internet access and environmentalism,” Breitbart London detailed.

In the days leading to the referendum, the New York Times summarized what was at stake.

“Mr. Renzi… is arguing that the constitutional overhaul proposed in the Sunday referendum would streamline government and create more stability in a country that has had 63 governments in 70 years. To speed up the often clogged legislative process, Mr. Renzi wants to drastically reduce the size of the Italian Senate and make it a mostly consultative body. Critically, the Senate would lose the power to bring down governing coalitions. Critics say the proposal puts too much power in the prime minister’s hands.”

Noting that Renzi’s favorability among the electorate, especially those under age 45, is plummeting, the Times added that “The beneficiary of that erosion appears to be the Five Star Movement, with its ability to win voters on the left and right with a mix of social liberalism, economic populism and tough law-and-order talk.”

The pro-EU political establishment avoided a second body blow, as it were, on Sunday when Norbert Hofer of Austria’s euroskeptic, anti-immigration Freedom Party, which the media describes as far right, failed to win the election for the country’s largely ceremonial presidency. Hofer seems to have waffled at the 11th hour on whether to call for an EU referendum in Austria, the London Telegraph suggested.

In the run-up to the U.S. presidential election, Madonna claimed that she would give oral sex to Hillary Clinton voters, but the pop diva never delivered on that promise.

Do you think that it is at all plausible that Paola Saulino means what she allegedly says about supposed sexual favors for No voters in the Italian referendum or is it just open to other interpretations or a publicity stunt of some kind?

[Featured Image by Franco Origlia/Getty Images]