Natalie Portman Ads Banned By British Regulatory Agency

The Natalie Portman ads for a Dior mascara have been banned by a British advertising regulatory agency, the Telegraph is reporting. The Advertising Standards Authority doesn’t feel the advertisements in question are being completely honest with customers. As a result, the ASA has filed a complaint against the company.

The offending ad campaign features a close up of Natalie Portman wearing the Dior Show New Look Mascara, which retails for $28.50. According to the company, the product “thickens, separates and extends the lashes for an infinitely multiple lash effect.” The ads featuring the Thor co-star were designed to showcase their amazing new product. However, the Advertising Standards Authority believes the images have been heavily photoshopped in order to exaggerate the mascara’s effects.

“We were concerned that we had not seen evidence that the visual representation of the product’s effects on Natalie Portman’s lashes, as featured in the ad, could be achieved through use of the product only, particularly as we understood that post-production retouching on the lash area had taken place,” the ASA said in the complaint.

As a result of their findings, the ad is not permitted to appear in any publications in its current form. If Dior wishes to continue using Natalie Portman as the face of its product line, then they will need to adjust the advertisement in question.

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According to The Huffington Post, the Advertising Standards Authority received the complaint from rival L’Oreal UK, a company which is also facing their own problems with the regulatory agency. It would seem that misery loves company.

While Dior admits that they did digitally retouch the advertisements, the company claims it was only done in the name of uniformity. Alterations were made to the original photograph in order to “separate/increase the length and curve of a number of her lashes and to replace/fill a number of missing or damaged lashes, for a more stylised, uniform and tidy effect.”

Do you think the Natalie Portman ads should be banned if Dior digitally enhanced the effects of its product?