Electoral Map 2016 Results: Will Michigan Soon Be Called For President-Elect Donald Trump?

The 2016 electoral map results are still incomplete. Of course, shortly after his win in the state of Pennsylvania, which pushed his electoral vote total past the 270 mark, Republican nominee Donald J. Trump became President-elect in the early morning hours of November 9. However, a few states have taken a little bit longer to officially fall into the red or blue category.

New Hampshire, for example, wasn’t called until November 14. Eventually, The Associated Press announced that former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had won the states’ four electoral votes.

Though Tuesday will mark two weeks since election day, the Great Lakes state of Michigan has still yet to officially be called, making it the last state yet to be decided. However, most of the signs appear to be pointing to a slim victory for President-elect Trump, who has wasted little time in making Cabinet selections since winning a historic election.

According to Lauren Gibbons of MLive, Trump currently has a lead that is slightly beyond 13,000 votes. In all likelihood, he should be able to carry the state.

“Unofficial results from the Michigan Secretary of State’s office show Trump ahead by a little more than 13,000 votes. Some national news outlets, including the Associated Press, have not yet called the state for Trump because the margin over Democrat Hillary Clinton was so slim.”

As also reported by Gibbons in the MLive article, the announcement of whether or not Trump won the state of Michigan shouldn’t be too far away. The results could be made official later this month.

“The Secretary of State doesn’t “call” elections, but officials say the unofficial results are unlikely to shift substantially when they’re officially certified later this month.”

“All of Michigan’s 83 counties have until Nov. 22 to verify the election results, and the state Board of Canvassers will meet Nov. 28 to make it official.”

The criteria for an “automatic recount” was discussed in the MLive article as well. According to Fred Woodhams, the spokesperson for the Secretary of State, this can happen if the outcome turns out to be within 2,000 votes.

Michigan hasn’t voted for a Republican since 1988, when a majority of the states’ voters selected George H.W. Bush in his landslide victory over Michael Dukakis. President-elect Trump campaigned heavily in the state of Michigan, especially in the weeks leading up to the election.

Though many polls showed him behind in Michigan, Trump and his team always seemed to believe that Michigan was in play. There were plenty of other surprises in the 2016 electoral map results as well.

If Trump indeed wins the Wolverine State, it will be yet another blow to the Democrat’s “blue wall.” Michigan would mark yet another traditionally blue state that he was able to flip, joining both Wisconsin and the aforementioned Pennsylvania. Carrying the swing states of Ohio and Florida was obviously huge as well.

From the get-go, many believed that appealing to “Reagan Democrats” who are in the Rust Belt would be key to a potential Trump victory. The 2016 electoral map results affirmed that this was a winning strategy.

According to the Detroit News, President-elect Trump was able to turn a total of 12 counties who voted for President Obama back in 2012, flipping them from blue to red. Despite the fact that 2012 GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney had a previous connection to Michigan, as he was born there and his father served as a governor of the state, Trump was clearly able to outperform him. In the Detroit News article, former U.S. House of Representative member and 2010 gubernatorial candidate Pete Hoekstra talked about the difference between Trump and Romney.

“With Mitt, they saw kind of a professor and what they saw with Trump was a fighter,” the former U.S. congressman said.

The 2016 electoral map results have not come without controversy, however. Clinton won the popular vote, marking just the fourth time time in U.S. history that the winner of the popular vote ended up losing the election. It is also the second time in the past five elections that this scenario has unfolded, with Al Gore winning the popular vote over George W. Bush in 2000.

According to CNN, the current 2016 electoral map results put President-elect Trump at 290 and Clinton at 232. Winning Michigan’s 16 electoral votes would make Trump the first Republican nominee to win 300 or more electoral votes since President George H.W. Bush won 426 in 1988.

[Featured Image by Scott Olson/Getty Images]