WikiLeaks Facing ‘Unrelenting’ Cyber Attacks On Election Day, Will It Impact Election Outcome? [Video]

In a strange twist of fate, WikiLeaks has become an integral part of the 2016 presidential election; now the “whistle-blowing” organization claims that it is facing unrelenting cyber attacks on Election Day. According to WikiLeaks on Twitter, the DDoS cyber attacks have not stopped for the last 24 hours.

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Despite the reported efforts to shut WikiLeaks down via cyber attacks, the organization has managed to continue its efforts to influence the U.S. presidential election through the so-called “Podesta Emails,” dumping another batch as millions of Americans cast their ballots for their candidate of choice in November 8. WikiLeaks posted batch 35 of “The Podesta Emails” in the midst of their alleged unrelenting cyber attack Tuesday, reports Heatstreet.

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In addition to posting the 35th installment of “The Podesta Emails” while claiming to be under an unrelenting cyber attack, WikiLeaks also posted an update from the organization’s head honcho, Julian Assange. Included in the Assange statement? His reasons for admittedly meddling in the U.S. presidential election (although he says it’s not intentional but rather collateral damage), something that many have been questioning for months now.

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For the duration of the election cycle, WikiLeaks has seemingly targeted Hillary Clinton and the DNC with the emails they’ve chosen to dump on the American voters and the world.

In recent days and weeks, WikiLeaks has repeatedly claimed that U.S. presidents are “selected, not elected.” Prior to today’s cyber attacks, WikiLeaks has even posted hacked emails that seem to confirm the organization’s allegations that the United States government has a history of grooming presidential candidates prior to them being elected by the people.

According to WikiLeaks, “there are no U.S. elections.”

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While WikiLeaks was able to release a 35th batch of Podesta emails on Election Day, the unrelenting cyber attacks on the website has made accessing them virtually impossible for curiosity seekers. Reportedly, the emails were among the thousands that have been hacked from John Podesta’s Gmail account, and who knows what titillating information they could have contained?

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Few American voters were able to access the information. They received an “internal server error” message rather than the potentially life-altering WikiLeaks information they were looking for.

For weeks, WikiLeaks has promised a giant “surprise.” As Fox News reports, the major WikiLeaks “October Surprise” was an epic failure. Julian Assange had generated massive speculation that “he would reveal game-changing information” about Hillary Clinton and possibly even sink her campaign for good. WikiLeaks didn’t come through, disappointing followers of the whistle-blowing site who had high hopes and expectations for the WikiLeaks “October Surprise.”

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After the October failure, WikiLeaks followers were led to believe that perhaps a “November Surprise” was coming their way. As USASupreme reported, Julian Assange signaled to his followers that WikiLeaks would get some substantial, potentially “Clinton wrecking” information released before the election.

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Later, WikiLeaks’ Assange changed his tune somewhat, indicating that he wasn’t specifically targeting Clinton’s campaign.

“The material that WikiLeaks is going to publish before the end of the year is of … a very significant moment in different directions, affecting three powerful organizations in three different states as well as … the U.S election process.”

That claim seemed to crumble on Election Day, when Assange admitted that, amid cyber attacks, WikiLeaks has been targeting the Clinton campaign. Although, Assange claimed that the reason for the apparent Clinton-targeting is that WikiLeaks (which claims to not actually hack but simply publish what other sources have hacked) doesn’t have information from the other presidential candidate’s campaigns.

Be that as it may, WikiLeaks (cyber attacks and all) has had a huge impact on this election cycle, in many cases seemingly driving potential voters in the direction of Donald Trump.

As The Guardian reported last week, 2016 has been a bizarre and unprecedented presidential election cycle. Many have claimed that the undecided U.S. voters might determine the outcome of the entire election. Is it possible that Election Day’s WikiLeaks cyber attacks could have prevented undecided voters from accessing critical information vital to their voting decision?

[Featured Image by Richard Frazier/Shutterstock]