Julia Ann: Porn Law California Proposition 60 Is ‘Deceptive,’ Election Vote Win Will Give Free Reign For Lawsuits Against PornHub, Sex Stars Who Don’t Use Condoms

Adult film star Julia Ann is urging California voters to vote “No” on Proposition 60, saying the deceptively worded ballot initiative will lead to lawsuits against adult performers who don’t use condoms and essentially bankrupt the adult film industry in California, KFNS (St. Louis) is reporting.

At first glance, Proposition 60 seems pretty straightforward: according to BallotPedia, the proposed law would require adult film producers to require the use of condoms in any scene which involves penetrative sex with a penis. The condoms wouldn’t have to be shown on the screen, but producers would be required to provide proof that the actors wore condoms.

proposition 60

Furthermore, producers of adult films would be forced to pay the cost of routine medical exams, including sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing, for the performers, and would be required to be licensed by the State of California every two years.

From a public-health standpoint, requiring the use of condoms in adult films makes perfect sense; after all, condoms are an almost-foolproof way of preventing the spread of STDs, including AIDS, to say nothing of unwanted pregnancy. And of course, outside of the sex-work industry, in no industry is the spread of STDs a bigger concern than in the adult film industry.

Adult film star and Adult Video News Hall of Fame member Julia Ann (Julia Tavella) is having none of that. She has become the de facto adult film industry spokesperson in opposing Proposition 60.

California Proposition 60
Adult film actress Julia Ann is the adult film industry's voice against California Proposition 60. [Image by Toglenn via Wikimedia Commons by CC BY-SA 4.0]

Back in September, Julia took to the Adult DVD Talk message boards to say why she opposes Proposition 60. Calling it a “wolf in sheep’s clothing,” she says the problem with the bill is some language buried in the law that allows “any resident of California” to sue adult film actors and producers, or anyone else with a financial interest in the film, for not using condoms. This, she says, would create a “lawsuit bonanza” that would cost California — and the adult film industry in particular — millions of dollars.

Julia Ann is not alone in her opposition to Proposition 60. In fact, according to BallotPedia, the California Republican Party, the California Democratic Party, the California Libertarian Party, and the seven largest newspapers in California — including The Los Angeles Times — all oppose the measure.

“The proposition would, in effect, make every Californian a potential condom cop by both mandating condom use and creating a private right of action so that any resident who spots a violation in a pornographic film shot in the state could sue and collect cash from the producers and purveyors if they prevail in court.”

Furthermore, the Times notes that, until 2012, the adult film industry — at least, what is left of it — was concentrated in the L.A. area. That changed in 2012 with the passage of Measure B, a law similar to Proposition 60 that required adult film actors to wear condoms. All Measure B succeeded in doing was driving the industry out of L.A.

Already the adult film industry is a shadow of its former self, according to a 2015 Crave report. The culprit is, of course, the internet, with its abundance of free, amateur (or semi-professional) adult content just a click away. Considering that consumers aren’t likely to pay for something that they can get in abundance for free, the adult film industry in California barely survives, now catering to that small subset of consumers who prefer professional production values and experienced actors.

Do you agree with Julia Ann that California Proposition 60 will devastate the remainder of the California adult film industry?

[Featured Image by Svittlana/Shutterstock]