WikiLeaks: Cheryl Mills On Obama Emails, ‘We Need To Clean This Up’

WikiLeaks has finally dropped a potential nuclear bomb after a series of explosive and infuriating emails leaked from Clinton’s campaign chairman John Podesta. The 18th document dump of Wikileaks’s “Podesta Emails” that has happened over the course of just a couple of weeks confirms a public FBI report that said President Obama knew about Hillary Clinton’s private server.

Last year, President Obama was asked when he had learned of Hillary Clinton’s private email server, and he exhibited an extraordinarily uncharacteristic moment of amnesia when he said claimed he found about it “when everyone else learned it on the news reports.”

This did not sit well with a large portion of the population, as it sounded insincere and unbelievable. And evidently, it was insincere because the FBI publicized its report that Obama knew about it all along.

In a story from September, I wrote that long-time Clinton aide Human Abedin seemed startled during an interview with the FBI when they told her they knew the pseudonymous author of several emails to Clinton was Obama.

She asked them, “How is this not classified?”

Apparently, Clinton was required to notify the White House of any changes in her email address so that Obama would be sure to get them. Otherwise, those emails would be filtered and rejected by the server.

What prompted Cheryl Mills’ panicked email to John Podesta was a tweet by Buzzfeed political editor Katherine Miller, who posted a screen cap of Obama’s response to a reporter asking him about his knowledge of Clinton’s emails and her private server.

WikiLeaks revealed that Cheryl Mills emailed Podesta about Obama lying about Clinton email server.
[John Locher/AP Images]

And on Tuesday morning, in its latest document release, WikiLeaks email ID 31077 has the smoking gun that could prove, beyond a doubt, that Clinton and her camp were scrambling to cover up the lie just weeks before she officially announced her run for the Democratic nomination.

Clinton aide and attorney Cheryl Mills wrote John Podesta a curt, short message indicating displeasure at the president’s dishonesty.

“We need to clean this up — he has emails from her — they do not say state.gov.”

It’s not clear how Mills intended to clean up the future scandal, but it’s evident that they knew about it and were in a panic. The revelation also corresponds to the FBI report that President Obama used a fake name to communicate directly with Hillary Clinton using a non-government private email, potentially to avoid the Freedom of Information Act.

To compound this, WikiLeaks revealed that John Podesta lost his smartphone in 2015 while getting out of a taxicab. An assistant of Podesta’s located the phone and retrieved it for him, sparking speculation that the leaks aren’t actually the result of a Russian hack, but more as a result of Podesta’s own ineptitude.

As the Inquisitr previously reported, neither Podesta nor his aide seemed worried about the potential security issues, which is strange, given the campaign chairman’s long history in the world of the interwebs. In the 1980s, before the internet as we know it came about, Podesta was a prominent lobbyist for the Electronic Messaging Association.

According to WikiLeaks, his emails would have been easy to hack; his password was simply p@ssw0rd. It is a scathing revelation of a man who was supposedly on the cutting edge of technology 30 years ago.

The unveiling of President Obama as an active participant in keeping the curtain pulled on Washington dealings and of Clinton’s shady behavior haven’t helped his public perception, either.

In the last several weeks, WikiLeaks has pumped out emails from John Podesta’s trove like the organization is limited for time, which they probably are.

Julian Assange’s recent silence due to his lack of internet, the sudden change in WikiLeaks’s stochastic terminator algorithm, the change in voice and odd behavior of the WikiLeaks Twitter account have all combined to foment a growing sense of concern and frustration about just what has happened to him. It has given a sense of urgency to WikiLeaks as a whole, and to its supporters, to glean as much as they can from the emails, and Cheryl Mills can’t “clean this up” fast enough.

[Featured Image by Susan Walsh/AP Images]