Watch Hurricane Matthew Coverage Live Online: Find Streaming News Video, Live Updates, And Tracking Map As Major Storm Makes Landfall

Hurricane Matthew is set to bear down on Florida, and those who want to track the storm from out of harm’s way will have plenty of opportunities to watch news coverage of the storm live online, check out evacuation and weather alert updates, and even see live-streaming video as the storm makes landfall.

The hurricane is expected to start hitting the Florida coast on Thursday night, making landfall as either a Category 4 or Category 5 storm, the most powerful on the scale of measurement and the most powerful to strike the state’s east coast since Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

As Weather.com noted, the storm is expected to have an impact all along the southern east coast.

“Matthew will bring destructive hurricane conditions to eastern Florida, the Georgia coast and coastal South Carolina.

“‘Sandy-like’ storm surge for parts of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and flooding rain are also likely.

“Matthew will then meander off the Southeast coast well into next week.”

Forecasters are calling it a once-in-a-generation storm, with potentially the most destructive winds the northeast and east-central parts of Florida have ever seen. It will also be the only Category 4 hurricane to strike that part of Florida or Georgia coast since one that hit St. Simons Island, Georgia, in 1898.

Hurricane Matthew already tore through the Caribbean, leaving more than 300 dead in Haiti.

“There is severe damage to the communities, and hundreds of deaths are expected and many more injured,” Enzo di Taranto, the head of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in Haiti, told the New York Times. “There will be a severe impact on the environment, agriculture and water systems.”

“Schools, hospitals and police stations, everything that was there when the hurricane hit was in some way damaged, because of the strengths of the wind,” di Taranto added.

Millions of people in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina have been told to evacuate their homes and leave the area, with officials in those states issuing dire warnings to residents.

“The storm has already killed people. We should expect the same impact in Florida,” Florida governor Rick Scott said on Thursday.

The storm is projected to travel along the east coast before moving off to sea, but bending back toward Florida again on Tuesday of next week.

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The storm has some major political implications as well. Florida has become a hotly-contested battleground between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and both candidates pulled campaign staff out of the state late this week.

Both candidates also made references to the storm on the campaign trail.

“It looks like it’s a big one and it’s going to be a bad one,” Trump told supporters at a town hall in New Hampshire. “Please know that we are praying for you and everyone in the path: You’ve got to take care of yourself, you’ve got to get out of the area, you’ve got to listen.”

Those who want to follow live updates of Hurricane Matthew will have plenty of places to turn. There are live updates at The Guardian and CNN, and the National Weather Service has both updates and information on warnings for areas along the path of the storm.

Many states along the path of Hurricane Matthew are also offering live updates of safety information, including a map of shelters across Georgia that is being updated in real time.

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There are a number of options for those looking to watch live news coverage of Hurricane Matthew. WPTV-News in West Palm Beach, which is set to feel the brunt of the storm, is offering live streaming video of the hurricane.

Others are offering a ground’s eye view of Hurricane Matthew. The YouTube page StormChasingVideo has live streaming video from correspondents in Florida. The video can be seen below, but be warned that it can contain some coarse language.

Those who want to watch news coverage of Hurricane Matthew live online can find more streaming video from CNN by clicking here.

[Featured Image by John Bazemore/AP Images]