Watch WikiLeaks’ October Surprise Press Conference Live Online: Streaming Video Link, Full Replay For Julian Assange’s Tuesday Announcement

Watch WikiLeaks October Surprise Press Conference Live Online: Streaming Video Link, Full Replay For Julian Assange's Tuesday Announcement

Viewers can watch the WikiLeaks press conference live online and see what kind of October surprise Julian Assange will have for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

The press conference, the subject of much international speculation, had been scheduled for 10 a.m. in Berlin, but it has reportedly been pushed back to close to 11 a.m. (4 a.m. ET). Live streaming video can be found below.

The news conference marks the 10-year anniversary of WikiLeaks, the international organization dedicated to releasing large swaths of information from governments, including sensitive documents and diplomatic communications.

The event started with a video showing the major releases from WikiLeaks over the last decade, including video that showed an American helicopter crew in Iraq launching an attack that killed civilians, including international journalists. Those hoping to find out some dirt on Hillary Clinton were left waiting, with the first 30 minutes of the press conference dedicated to documenting the organization’s history.

There has been a good deal of international attention online for the WikiLeaks press conference, with close to 60,000 people streaming the video just on the Right Side Broadcasting YouTube page, even at 4:30 a.m. ET. Other live streams of the press conference had tens of thousands more viewers.

There was plenty of media attention ahead of the news conference, including reports claiming that Assange may have canceled it due to security concerns. The WikiLeaks founder later confirmed that it would be on as scheduled, but instead of speaking outside the Ecuadorian embassy where he has been living, it would take place live in Berlin.

Those who watch the WikiLeaks press conference live online will likely see some kind of political attack against Clinton. Early this week, the site “liked” a tweet claiming that Hillary Clinton’s campaign would be devastated by whatever is released.

There has also plenty of speculation as to the nature of the WikiLeaks press conference, but there may have been a hint on Monday with a story released claiming that as Secretary of State, Clinton once called for a drone strike on Assange.

The story, which was published on the right-wing site True Pundit, claimed that in 2010, Clinton speculated openly during a meeting about the possibility of taking out Assange, who at the time had just released hundreds of thousands of diplomatic cables.

“That is when a frustrated Clinton, sources said, at some point blurted out a controversial query.

“‘Can’t we just drone this guy?’ Clinton openly inquired, offering a simple remedy to silence Assange and smother Wikileaks via a planned military drone strike, according to State Department sources. The statement drew laughter from the room which quickly died off when the Secretary kept talking in a terse manner, sources said. Clinton said Assange, after all, was a relatively soft target, ‘walking around’ freely and thumbing his nose without any fear of reprisals from the United States.”

This report was called into question, with many pointing out that the site True Pundit does not offer any proof of the claim and had been caught peddling other shaky stories, including an unbacked claim that Hillary Clinton was wearing an invisible earpiece during the NBC Town Hall event that took place in September.

Whether the report is true or not, Julian Assange has been a thorn in Clinton’s side during this election season. WikiLeaks was behind a massive release of Democratic National Committee emails, including some showing that DNC officials were slanted against Clinton’s main competitor, Vermont senator Bernie Sanders. Tuesday’s press conference is expected to be an even bigger blow against Clinton.

This story will be updated with live information of the WikiLeaks press conference as it becomes available.

[Featured Image by Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP Images]