Brock Turner Update: Parents Call Police Over Armed Protesters

Brock Turner was released from jail on Friday after serving only 90 days for sexual assault, and apparently, the general public isn’t pleased. His parents, fearing for his safety, called the police on Saturday to assist them with security as the crowd of protesters grew larger outside of their Ohio home.

The New York Daily News reports that Turner’s parents, Dan and Carleen Turner, are dealing with a number of people who showed up at their Sugarcreek Township residence to protest what they perceive as legal injustice. The crowd surfaced to rally against Turner’s short sentence behind bars.

Turner was originally sentenced to just six months in jail for the 2015 rape of a young woman that took place behind a dumpster close to a Stanford University frat house. He ended up doing only half of his sentence for good behavior.

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Around a dozen protesters gathered outside the Brock family home as he made his way back to Ohio after serving time in California’s Santa Clara County jail. Most were holding white signs with various messages written across them, including “Castrate all rapists” and “No sympathy for racists.” ABC News reports that some of the protesters were armed, but so far, no violence or verbal threats of violence were reported.

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Turner returned to his Greene County home as part of the stipulations of his release. He’s expected to register as a sex offender at the county sheriff’s department. His sex offender status will remain with him for life.

Some of Turner’s neighbors are unhappy with his return, not only because of the hoards of protesters but also because a number of young women live around him.

According to one neighbor, “To have somebody like that in our neighborhood, who isn’t very friendly to young women — I just have an issue with.”

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A different neighbor complained that a protester left a profane message, written in chalk, on the sidewalk near Turner’s home. Since young children live in the neighborhood, the Sugarcreek Township resident felt that the protesters weren’t going about things they way the should.

“Go protest your congressman, the courthouse — Not the neighborhood we live in.”

Despite neighborhood complaints, it isn’t likely that the protests will end anytime soon. One of the protesters, apparently outraged over Turner’s release, said that the former Stanford swimmer shouldn’t have a “pleasant life,” given the crime he committed.

“He’s not going to live some happy pleasant life. We’re going to never let him forget what he did.”

Another protester added that making Turner feel discomfort would at least give him some form of punishment for his actions.

“If he is uncomfortable then he begins to receive at least some punishment that he deserves for his crime.”

Greene County Sheriff Gene Fischer promised the public that Turner wouldn’t be treated with “kid gloves.” He’ll be treated just as any other Tier III sex offender, and no amount of money or privilege will stand in the way.

According to the sheriff, “We’re not treating him with kid gloves. We’re going to treat him like every other sex offender that comes through the doors.”

Turner is required to check in with the sheriff and register as a sex offender four times a year for the remainder of his life.

Fischer continued, “We will go down to his house where he is living to confirm he is living there. We will pop in unannounced from time to time to make sure he’s living where he says he’s living.”

Another stipulation for Brock Turner is that he’ll never be able to participate in USA Swimming. The former Stanford swimmer once showed talent and potential, winning numerous state and national championships.

[Image via the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office]