There Are Too Many Problems In Venezuela To Believe In Nicolas Maduro Anymore

It seems that there are constant threats being pointed out from around the world on a daily basis, and recently Nicolas Maduro made headlines across the globe as a threat to his own people.

Recent reports, such as that by The New York Times, on the protests in Venezuela are also covering the oppression caused by the Nicolas Maduro Administration as well as his own response to those issues saying that those opposed to his presidency have staged the protests as a coup to overthrow him.

In recent months, we’ve seen similar claims from rulers in other countries such as in Turkey, which is under the rule of a right-wing government, who claimed there was a coup against him masterminded my Fethullah Gulen from the United States.

THE FOOD CRISIS IN VENEZUELA HAS TAKEN A TURN FOR THE WORST

The Nicolas Maduro government claims to be that of a socialist left-wing, whose failures are enough to be targeted by the right-wing parties in the United States as an example of where America could be heading under another Democratic administration.

Hugo Chávez is still worshiped by the people of Venezuela and it isn't doing them any good.
But the real issue is over power before their political ideologies. Meaning that Nicolas Maduro has been using the populist message of former president Chavez to energize the masses time and time again.

With regard to Nicolas Maduro, this message has been touted repeatedly since the transfer of power took place after Hugo Chavez’s death in 2013.

‘DEFEAT’ OF PROTESTS IN VENEZUELA ARE VIEWED AS A TRIUMPH BY NICOLAS MADURO

This alone should be suspicious to the rest of the world, not to mention the increased militarization of Venezuelan society, the mass protests against him calling for a referendum and his refusal to hold one this year.

Venezuelan organize mass protests against Maduro.
Any request by the people to carry through with a referendum — which is seen as a threat to his power — is not returned by his response to do so. Instead, he viciously attacks outside influences, and uses the coup attempt against Hugo Chavez in the early 2000s as the reason not give the people what they want.

The longer Nicolas Maduro continues to make such claims, the longer he’s able to continue to reign over the people and make up any excuse he can to prevent them from gaining leverage against him.

HUNGRY MOB OF VENEZUELANS BREAK INTO ZOO AND BUTCHER HORSE FOR FOOD BLAME ECONOMIC CRISIS

In 2009, a referendum was made to banish term limits for Hugo Chavez and following his death, when his vice-president Nicolas Maduro was made the head of state, there were obvious concerns as to how he would govern.

Much has been said about the falling oil prices and the inflation to follow, which has created a new cycle of blame for Nicolas Maduro to throw around. But it would seem that rather than make some hard choices, the president of Venezuela has decided to act as a paranoid dictator, scaring the population as a whole that he’s going to continue to throw the country into uncertainly and never leave the Miraflores Palace.

Nicolas Maduro was no doubt on a learning curve when he became vice-president, and even he seemed uncertain as to the responsibilities he would be taking on when he became president. But over time to him, it seems that a myriad of bad decisions on his part only needed certain adjustments “here” and “there” throughout his role as a president for him to begin to go down the slippery slope of a dictator, enacting certain powers to keep his seat and rule with an iron fist, against all opposed.

THE U.S. SHOULD NOT EXTRADITE FETHULLAH GULEN, TO A PARANOID TURKISH GOVERNMENT

In comparison to Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who is the president of Turkey and who has also made bold claims of a coup in his country, he has very little confidence to lead with certainty on a positive track.

Both leaders share similarities in their paranoia and hostility against outsiders, which in itself should concern people. They both give the appearance of strength, but the flaws with Nicolas Maduro are more obvious than they are with Erdogan, where he has less support on his side and more people are suffering for it.

[Photo by Ariana Cubillos/AP Images]