Did UFO Over Auckland, New Zealand, Explode? Or Was There An Attempt To Shoot It Down?

A video capture of an Unidentified Flying Object (UFO) over Auckland, New Zealand, set the internet abuzz recently when the unexplained image in question seemed to be caught in an intense flare of light. The UFO hunter that originally filmed the image speculated that the object was firing thrusters to head off into space. But moments later, a shadowy image seems to flare again before disappearing altogether. So what happened? Did the UFO experience a couple of explosions before being obliterated? Was the flare just sun glare off a banking airplane’s wing? Or could the UFO hunter possibly be correct? Or could there be another explanation for the mysterious sighting?

Latest UFO Sightings reported August 20 that a video clip of a small black dot moving toward a cloud formation at sunset over Aukland, New Zealand, had sparked the internet into a speculative frenzy. Upon magnification of the black dot image, it was seen to be more disc-shaped (although the blurred image can be seen to oddly fluctuating). The UFO in the video, which was taken on August 2, then seemed to disappear after an apparent explosion, but the UFO hunter who spotted the oddity, YouTube user UFO-fan, noted in the comments section that after what appeared to be an explosion, the object could be seen faintly rising against the sky — and there was a second intense light flare prior to the object seeming to disappear.

Comments on the video show there are about an equal number of viewers that agree that UFO-fan actually caught a UFO on camera and that the video shows an airplane winging through the sky, the intense glints (including the one that resembles an explosion) merely the sun’s rays reflecting off of the craft’s wings. In fact, one viewer, Matthew Tyler, posted that New Zealand’s largest airport was located just six miles from where the UFO video was shot.

One commenter, Rayvhenwing Sui Generis, observed that the image did not look as it was a fighter jet “firing its thrusters” and seemed “totally spherical & spinning…”

UFO-fan also pointed out in a reply to a comment that “A ‘UFO’ making a right turn will also have the same effects but in this case, because of the size of the glare, I still inclined to say it was a blast or an explosion.”

Scott C. Waring, who operates the UFO Sightings Daily blog, wrote in his post of the event that the New Zealand sighting clip was “a great video.” He added that the video was taken at sunset, which he claimed was the “most common time to catch a UFO, due to the setting sun’s position.”

Strangely, the comments never turned toward a more aggressive explanation — that of the possibility that the UFO may have experienced what looked like an explosion due to some type of anti-aircraft round or missile detonating near it. As the image receded and started to fade from view, there was a second flare as well, an intensity in the light that UFO-fan noted preceded the object’s disappearance.

There were also no assertions that the dark disc-like object may have been a bird since birds can be seen winging around in the video — and the object appeared to come out of the tree shadows in the video’s lower right corner. There is also those strange shifting, fluttering movements running alongside the “disc” as it flies, motions similar to what the of wings of a distorted bird would look like. But, if it’s a bird, how to explain the intense glares of light?

Still, why bother shoot down an airplane over Auckland, New Zealand? Or worse, shoot down a bird? Even worse, why shoot down a UFO over New Zealand?

According to Latest UFO Sightings, there have been several UFO spottings over New Zealand of late. A sighting at Tauranga Bay of Plenty occurred in March when a witness saw what seemed to be just a glittering star, but when light completely enveloped the entire room, he noticed that a bright, glowing orb could be seen moving from the southeast of his location. A witness reported a UFO sighting, also in March, at Tasman Bay of a mysterious object had quickly descended from the sky at a speed that seemed “faster than any known aircraft, but slower than a meteor.”

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