Reince Priebus: Mitt Romney Will Win Wisconsin

Reince Priebus: Mitt Romney Will Win Wisconsin

Reince Priebus has a lot of optimism for Mitt Romney’s chances for the closing weeks of the presidential campaign.

The Republican National Chairman says the GOP’s fundraising advantage and Romney’s chances of winning in one important state could help propel the candidate past President Obama. Republicans have 10 times the amount of money ready to be spent as Democrats do, he told the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.

“This was a great week. The RNC has $77 million in the bank and the Democrats have $7 million,” Reince Priebus said, citing the GOP’s internal figures.

Speaking before the GOP First District Fall Fest at the Wiswell Center on the Walworth County Fairgrounds in Wisconsin, Reince Priebus also had some good news for the local supports of Mitt Romney. Priebus predicted that Romney would be the first Republican to win the state since Ronald Reagan nearly swept the nation in 1984.

Priebus didn’t mention what he thought Romney’s margin of victory would be in Wisconsin, but said that was immaterial.

“As long as get our 10 electoral votes and don’t have a recount, I’m happy,” said Reince Priebus, the former chair of the Wisconsin Republican Party.

His comments come at a time when many are focused instead on the missteps of Romney’s campaign. A secret fundraiser tape released earlier this week shows Romney seemingly writing off the “47 percent” of Americans who pay no income tax, and other insider reports have spoken of disunity within the Romney campaign.

Priebus is totally committed to Romney winning — as he should be — but The Hill noted just how far that commitment goes. Earlier in the week Priebus was asked if he would rather have Romney beat Obama in November or his beloved Green Bay Packers win the Super Bowl.

“Romney beating Obama, absolutely,” Priebus said.

Reince Priebus can be seen on Sunday, appearing opposite Obama senior adviser David Axelrod on This Week. The ABC political show pledges to tackle the question of whether Romney can get his campaign back on track with less than 50 days to Election Day, and if he can turn the focus to President Obama’s record rather than the focus on his “47 percent” comments released earlier this week.