Donald Trump: Harvard Republican Club Won’t Endorse GOP Nominee For First Time Ever Because They’re ‘Ashamed’ [Video]

Donald Trump has yet another political claim to fame today; for the first time since its founding in 1888, the Harvard Republican Club has declined to endorse its party’s presidential nominee in the general election. According to the group’s public website, the Harvard Republican Club was created to “promote Republican principles, policies and candidates.” Apparently, as the Washington Post reports, Donald Trump doesn’t qualify.

According to the recent report, the Harvard Republican Club is “ashamed” of Donald Trump. It is that shame that has prompted the club to refuse to endorse the former reality TV star for president, at least according to a statement released by the club.

Not only is the Harvard Republican Club refusing to endorse Donald Trump for POTUS, according to a recent survey conducted among club members, the group is refusing to endorse the GOP nominee by a landslide. Only 10 percent of the Harvard Republican Club’s members said they would support Trump in the upcoming general election, according to reports.

The Harvard Republican Club is one of the most prestigious groups of young, collegiate Republicans in the United States. Many are blown away by the idea that in 2016, the Republican Party would nominate a candidate that deviates so far away from party ideals that the group would wholeheartedly refuse to provide an endorsement for the first time in well over 100 years.

Especially when they cite being “ashamed” of the candidate as the reason for their decision.

In the public statement issued by the Harvard Republican Club regarding the group’s refusal to endorse Donald Trump, the club says that Trump’s views are “antithetical to our values not only as Republicans, but as Americans.”

“The rhetoric he espouses –from racist slander to misogynistic taunts– is not consistent with our conservative principles, and his repeated mocking of the disabled and belittling of the sacrifices made by prisoners of war, Gold Star families, and Purple Heart recipients is not only bad politics, but absurdly cruel.”

According to the Harvard Republican Club, not only are its members ashamed of Donald Trump, one of the most recent and highly regarded historical Republican presidents would be, too. In their public statement, the Harvard Republican Club says that former U.S. President Ronald Reagan “called on us to maintain liberty at home by upholding the democratic process and respecting our opponents.”

Per their public statement explaining their refusal to endorse Trump, the Harvard Republican Club insists that Trump’s “values” would be an affront to Reagan.

In addition to withholding their critical and historically guaranteed endorsement for the Republican presidential nominee, the Harvard Republican Club called upon Republican elected officials to withhold or renounce their support of the GOP nominee as well.

“We will not stand for this vitriolic rhetoric that is poisoning our country and our children.”

While the Harvard Republican Club, the oldest and most respected Republican collegiate organization in the United States, has declined to endorse Trump for POTUS, other college Republican groups haven’t necessarily done the same.

In fact, a group known as Students for Trump has sworn that it has chapters all across the United States just brimming with members that are planning on voting for Donald in November.

Down in the U.S. Southwest, the Texas Federation of College Republicans also endorsed Donald Trump. According to the Lone Star State college Repubs, they support Trump because “Americans voted in the primaries and made a choice.”‘

Despite getting some support from American college students (albeit not those affiliated with the Harvard Republican Club), Donald Trump simply doesn’t poll well with young American adults. A recent poll indicates that Donald only manages to scrape by in the demographic, earning only nine percent of the vote among potential voters aged 30 or younger.

Even Gary Johnson and Jill Stein do better among young American voters than Trump, at least at this stage in the election cycle.

What do you think? Should the Harvard Republican Club bite the bullet and endorse their party’s nominee, or are they correct in withholding their endorsement from Donald Trump?

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