‘Harry Potter And The Cursed Child’ Ticket Prices Soar, Fans Scramble To Get Tickets

Harry Potter And The Cursed Child Ticket Prices Soar, Fans In Uproar

As Harry Potter and the Cursed Child ticket prices continue to soar to magical heights, fans from around the globe are voicing their frustration over the issue and scrambling to get tickets. In April, 2016, when the first round of 250,000 tickets became available, Belfast Telegraph, indicated that entrance prices to the highly-anticipated performance soared to as much as £900 on sites like eBay and StubHub, while fans were still waiting in online ticket queues.

At the time, some fans who were lucky enough to obtain tickets from official Harry Potter and the Cursed Child ticketing platforms (ATG and Nimax) were able to grab them for the much more affordable price of £15 to £20. The lower-priced tickets were limited to 300 seats per performance.

In case you aren’t familiar with exchange rates, they fluctuate daily. For example, today CoinMill.com indicates that £900 is equivalent to $1,179. That would certainly buy a lot of Butterbeer, wouldn’t it? While we’re on the subject of this butterscotch-tasting mug of good cheer, why not take a couple of minutes to watch the following video. Making Harry Potter Butterbeer is probably easier than you think.

As far as tickets to the play go, today, an additional 250,000 tickets for the December, 2016, West End run were released to the public. The Mirror explains that translates into 300 extra tickets for each upcoming show.

Just like before, you can purchase tickets directly from ATG or NiaMax Theater. You also have the option of heading over to the play’s official website for more information.

In the event you weren’t lucky enough to get tickets, don’t panic. Here are two useful tips, which might make the difference between watching the performance in person or staying home and drowning your sorrows in the aforementioned Butterbeer.

A separate article from Mirror offers this advice. First, try the “Friday Forty.” Each Friday at 1 p.m., the play’s organizers will release 40 tickets for the following week’s show. You must visit a specific website to make the purchase, as soon as the countdown clock reaches zero.

If that isn’t successful, put your name on the “wish list.” By doing so, you may have the chance to purchase tickets, which have been returned for whatever reason. These tickets are sold on a first come, first served basis. A small service charge applies.

Just a word to the wise: even though you may be tempted to purchase tickets from a third-party vendor, to guarantee seats for the performance, you might want to think twice. A quick check of GetMeIn, viagogo, and StubHub show prices as high as triple the value or more.

When asked about purchasing Harry Potter and the Cursed Child tickets from third-party vendors, a spokesperson for the play had this to say about that.

“Please note that we reserve the right to refuse admission to customers with tickets purchased on re-sale websites. Tickets purchased through either of our official ticketing platforms must not be sold or advertised for sale on the Internet, in newspapers or elsewhere.”

The same spokesperson went on to say that tickets purchased in this manner will be automatically void.

In a previous interview, J. K. Rowling told fans about her desire to make Harry Potter and the Cursed Child financially accessible to everyone. She made the following statement.

“What we would really like most of all is to bring people in who have never been to the theater before. I would be so proud to think that kids from my kind of background, who didn’t come from particularly theater-going families, learn what theater is about through this show. That would be an incredible thing.”

Do you already have tickets to see Harry Potter and the Cursed Child? If not, you’re certainly not alone! Because of the popularity of this play, there’s always the chance that more tickets will be released in the future. Until then, there’s never a bad time to read a good book — especially when it revolves around the life of Harry Potter.

[Photo by Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP Images]