Andy Murray Wins Men’s Singles Wimbledon 2016 Final, Beats Milos Raonic

Andy Murray of Great Britain won his second Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championship Men’s Singles Final by beating Canadian Milos Raonic.

The second-seeded master of the game won 6-4, 7-6, 7-6 to the sixth-seeded Raonic, who gave a heroic fight on day 13 at London’s iconic SW19 court.

Andy Murray

While an emotional Andy Murray spent the minutes after the end of the match hugging the trophy he fought so hard to win, a sharp Raonic was a picture of affable calm in the post-match interview, as quoted by the Guardian, of his very first Grand Slam final.

“This one’s gonna sting so I’m going to make sure, as these courts are green, that I’m going to be back here. I keep plugging away. Every single day I try to get better, to give myself these chances, because I want to be back here. Thank you to my team, everybody that’s here, everybody that’s not here. We’ve dealt with a lot and I know I’m not the easiest to deal with. I love them a lot.”

Andy Murray

Murray was in confident spirits throughout the match, on a court where he has had, according to his own post-match testament, “some great wins and also some tough losses.”

Milos Raonic, on the other hand, has had to beat Roger Federer on the way to the finals. His smashing forehands were only eclipsed by few of the fastest serves ever, clocking speeds of 124 mph at times.

Viewers at Wimbledon chanted “Let’s go, Andy” and were treated to a clean game of tennis with no unnecessary flair or outbursts of flamboyance.

It’s his quietly assertive style of charging the net — something he certainly did in the third set tie-breaker of the match — that has garnered many a fan for Murray.

While his on-court fans included the likes of British Prime Minister David Cameron (whom Murray wryly thanked for doing a prime minister’s tough job), Benedict Cumberbatch, and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, among those who tweeted in joy at his victory were his former coach Amelie Mauresmo, Chris Evans, Gary Lineker, Juan Martin del Potro, and Pat Cash.

Andy Murray

Quoted in the same Guardian post, Murray’s statement was as reflective of his customary British humor as it was thankful.

“I played really good stuff but Milos has had a great few weeks on the grass and had some unbelievable wins. His match against Roger was a great match and he is one of the harder workers out there. Each time we’ve played each other, he’s made big movements. He has a really nice team, Carlos, Riccardo and John. His physical trainers are also very nice, well mannered. It’s true, it isn’t always the case. Sorry about the last few weeks.”

The match also witnessed a fierce and ruthless side of the otherwise muted Andy Murry. As reported by the Telegraph, Murray was caught on camera furiously berating his support staff with a swear word or two after his coach, Ivan Lendl, took a longish toilet break during the second set.

Andy Murray

The Wimbledon trophy is Murray’s third Grand Slam.

But to believe that the British are accustomed to the sight of Andy Murray holding up a trophy would be difficult once you hear the roars of the public gathered to cheer him in his victory as he lifts the cup up from the balcony.

[Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images]