Roswell UFO Memo: $10,000 Reward Offered To Decipher ‘Ramey Memo’ Believed To Be ‘Smoking Gun’ Evidence

A UFO researcher, Kevin Randle, has announced an offer of a “$10,000 reward for the first person or group/lab that can” decipher the text of a memo held in the hands of a top U.S. military officer in a photo in which the officer was shown examining debris allegedly freshly recovered from the 1947 Roswell UFO crash site.

Immediately after the crash at Roswell in 1947, Colonel William Blanchard at the Roswell Army Air Field ordered his public information officer, Lt. Walter Haut, to issue a statement that the debris from a crashed “flying disk” had been recovered at Roswell.

Military authorities promptly dispatched Jesse Marcel, an intelligence officer, to recover the debris and transport it to Fort Worth Army Air Field, later known as the Carswell Air Force Base, but currently the site of the Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base (NAS Fort Worth JRB).

When Marcel arrived at Fort Worth, he took the debris to General Roger Ramey’s office where the photo, showing the general and his chief of staff Colonel Thomas Dubois examining the debris on the floor, was shot.

The photo that shows Ramey examining the material on the floor with a memo held in his hand was distributed to the media as evidence.

The military authorities claimed that the initial press release that a “flying disk” had crashed at Roswell was mistaken. They claimed that the new photo showed General Ramey and his chief of staff examining debris from the object that crashed at Roswell, and that it was obvious from the photo that it was a weather balloon that had crashed.

But, years after the incident, in the 1980s, Marcel came forward and admitted that although the debris shown in the photo was a weather balloon, it was not the original material he recovered from the crash site at Roswell, New Mexico.

Explaining a photo which shows him crouched on the floor in Ramey’s office, holding the weather balloon debris, Marcel said he was ordered by his military superiors to go along with the weather balloon story.

Colonel Dubois also later admitted that the photograph showing the weather balloon debris was part of the effort by the authorities to cover up information about the object that actually crashed at Roswell (see YouTube below).

After the crash in 1947, the official story released to the media that the crashed object was in fact a weather balloon prevailed. But, Marcel’s testimony in the 1980s sparked further growth of conspiracy theory speculation about what actually happened at Roswell.

A subsequent inquiry, commissioned by Rep. Steven H. Schiff (R-NM1, 1989-1998) in 1993, forced the military authorities to admit that the weather balloon story was a cover-up. However, the authorities continued to deny that an extraterrestrial spacecraft crashed at Roswell.

The military claimed that the debris recovered from the crash site was really a device being developed at the time under a top secret dubbed Project Mogul. The alleged purpose of the project was to send a balloon equipped with devices to detect Soviet nuclear tests.

While the admission by the military authorities proved conclusively that Ramey had switched the real debris for a weather balloon, it did not confirm what actually crashed at Roswell. UFO researchers noted at time the authorities offered the Project Mogul explanation that if government had lied once to maintain secrecy about the nature of what crashed at Roswell and changed their story only after new disclosures, then they could have lied a second time to maintain the secrecy.

UFO researchers who had always doubted the weather balloon story believe that deciphering the memo in Ramey’s hand could reveal the truth about what government officials were trying to hide.

According to researchers, the memo could be the key to the decades-old Roswell UFO mystery.

Researchers have worked for decades to decipher the memo using available technology that zooms in on the photo and enhances the image to show the text of the memo (see video below).

Some researchers claim to have deciphered the memo. According to Open Minds-TV, David Rudiak claims to have deciphered 80 percent of the text and that there is a reference to a disc in the test and a reference to “victims of the wreck.”

But, his rendering of the text is controversial and not all researchers agree with it.

However, UFO researchers who agree with Rudiak’s interpretation of the memo claim they already have proof that a disc crashed at Roswell and that alien corpses were recovered from the site.

Oddly, the U.S. Air Force claimed in a report to have sent the photo “to a national-level organization for digitizing and subsequent photo interpretation and analysis,” according to Open Minds-TV.

But, the organization’s report issued on July 20, 1994, said that “even after digitizing, the photos were of insufficient quality to visualize either of the details sought for analysis.”

UFO researchers believe that the military authorities were being devious, and that their refusal to admit they knew what was written on the memo proved that they had a dark secret to keep about Roswell.

Randle is one of several UFO researchers who believe that authorities are desperately trying to hide vital information about Roswell. As part of latest efforts to solve the Roswell UFO mystery, he posted on his blog on June 16, an announcement offering a reward of $10,000 to anyone who is able to decipher the “Ramey memo.”

He claimed that the reward money was provided by a “trusted colleague,” who is also interested in “Roswell and UFOs and who has the money.”

“He is offering a $10,000 reward for the first person or group/lab that can provide a definite read of the Ramey memo,” the statement said.

According to Randle, anyone who would claim the reward would have to meet a number of criteria, “including full reproducibility of the result — with methodology of the individual/lab completely explained and transparent so that anyone knowledgeable can replicate in much the same way that the placard on the Not Roswell Slides was revealed.”

“There must be overwhelming agreement that the result is definitive with most of the text clear enough that there is little or no disagreement on what it says across a broad spectrum of people of all opinions whether true believer or complete skeptic,” the statement added.

[Image via CrackerClips Stock Media/Shutterstock]