Roanoke Colony Archaeologists Find Pieces Of Pottery That May Provide Clues To The ‘Lost Colony’

Joanna Jaguar - Author
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Jun. 24 2016, Updated 10:02 a.m. ET

Archaeologists digging at the site of the lost Roanoke colony in North Carolina have found shards of pottery, possibly from a medicine jar, that they believe are linked to the English settlers who disappeared from the mysterious colony more than four centuries ago.

The pottery fragments, no larger than a quarter, are the most significant find connected to the lost colony of Roanoke since the 1940s, says Eric Deetz, an archaeologist with the First Colony Foundation, who, along with the National Park Service, headed the dig. According to WTKR, the shards are blue, brown, and white, and archaeologists believe they are from a jar once used to mix salves and medicines by people of the lost Roanoke colony.

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“It was an exciting find. That pottery had something to do with the Elizabethan presence on that island.”

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The pottery fragments found by archaeologists at the site of the lost Roanoke colony proves, at the very least, that the lost colony did, at one point, inhabit Roanoke island. Although the pieces are “small and very fragile,” according to Deetz, “a single piece is as good as a whole pot” for identifying purposes. The particular glaze of the fragments dates them to the same time frame as the English settlers inhabiting Roanoke.

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“There’s no doubt that those pieces of pottery are from that time period. The pottery itself is a type of pottery which is a tin-glaze. This form was pretty much only used between the 1570s and 1620s.”

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The fragments were found about two feet underground, roughly 75 yards from an earthen mound that archaeologists believe was once a fort during the time the Roanoke colonists inhabited the island, reports Newsmax. Other pottery pieces have been found in the area, but because of their typically small size and fragility, these particular pieces are the only ones that have been large enough to classify as having come specifically from the lost Roanoke colony.

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