May 8, 2016
Former Arizona Governor Jan Brewer Wants To Be Trump's VP

Arizona's former governor, Jan Brewer, who has been described as "a conservative icon of sorts" during her six-year tenure, is now considered a serious choice to be Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's second-in-command.

According to the Arizona Republic, Brewer was making an appearance Sunday on the CNN program State of the Union, where she and a group of panelists were shown a list of 10 potential candidates to be Trump's running mate. Those included like former Secretary of State Conodoleezza Rice, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, and former Republican presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Marco Rubio.

When host Jake Tapper asked if Brewer had a favorite on that list she laughed and wondered who came up with it.

"They didn't put me on there," said Brewer, who's been considered an option, following an email sent to supporters of the National Republican Senatorial Committee.

"What about you? What about Jan Brewer? Would you be willing to be considered?" asked Tapper.

"Of course I would be! I would be willing to serve in any capacity that I could be of help with Donald on. But that's a tremendous list of people to choose from," said Brewer, praising the choices the show came up with.

GettyImages-527876056 edit
Many high profile names are being considered as Donald Trump's running mate in the 2016 Presidential Election. He's seen here speaking at Trump Tower in New York. [Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images]
"I certainly think that Newt, I've known him for a long time, we all have experienced what he can get done in Washington, D.C. And Marco Rubio would be terrific. Mary Fallin would be terrific."
As reported by Raw Story, Tapper proceeded to ask Jan Brewer if Trump should pick a woman as a nominee because of his unpopularity with women voters. The 71-year-old feels that voters want a candidate who will represent them overall and that gender shouldn't be a sole deciding factor.

"I don't necessarily think you need to pick a woman," said Brewer. "You know, this woman thing has gotten way out of control I believe."

"And I think it's been driven by the left, because they think that it's going to bring them over the end. But I think people, when they sit down to vote, they vote for the very best candidate."
The Phoenix Business Journal, reported that Brewer and Trump have similar views regarding immigration and have "bucked GOP orthodxy," as well as Brewer calling for Medicaid expansion and a temporary sales tax increase during her tenure as governor.

"Brewer, however, doesn't have the foreign policy or Washington experience Trump might look for in a running mate," said Michael Sunnucks, a senior reporter for the Phoenix Business Journal.

Jan Brewer has also called out Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's criticism of Trump calling him "abusive" and that he won't win the women's vote.

"Well, women do appreciate him," said Brewer. "And they [the Clintons] have a problem in their own house. And they have to recognize that and it needs to be acknowledged."

GettyImages-462479172 edit
Jan Brewer speaking at the Friars Club Roast of Terry Bradshaw at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix in January 2015. [Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images]Jan Brewer, who served as governor of Arizona from 2009 to 2015, previously endorsed Trump for president in February, as reported by CNN.

"This may be our last chance to ensure our children grow up in a country with borders, and with a government that protects its own people," said Brewer, in a statement. "This is our chance -- Donald Trump is our chance -- to save this country and Make America Great Again."

Other contenders to be Donald Trump's vice president include former Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn, and former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin.

However, Palin who also appeared Sunday on State of the Union said that she acknowledged that she's a controversial political figure and wouldn't want to hurt Trump's chances of winning, if she was on the ticket with him.

I wouldn't want to be a burden on the ticket, and I realize in many, many eyes, I would be that burden," said Palin. "So you know, I just -- I just want the guy to win. I want America to win."

[Photo by Jonathan Gibby/Getty Images]