Ingrid Lyne Killing: Suspect Acts Aloof During Questioning, Has History Of Threatening His Own Parents

The man accused of murdering Washington nurse and mother-of-three Ingrid Lyne apparently acted nonchalant and aloof when he was questioned by police about the alleged killing, authorities said on Thursday.

CBS News reported John Charlton, 37, the man accused of murdering and dismembering Lyne, 40, was detained on Monday night and during a grueling interrogation, didn’t seem phased that a woman he’d been dating for around a month was found dead. In fact, Seattle police said that he even seemed annoyed that he was being bothered since he claimed he didn’t remember what happened.

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According to what Seattle authorities have gathered so far, Charlton had a date with Lynne on Friday night. They went to a Marlins baseball game together and later on in the evening, ended up back at Lyne’s home. It’s still unclear whether Lyne invited Charlton over, but once he was inside her home, he allegedly killed the mom of three girls and began dismembering her in her own bathroom.

Charlton then allegedly drove away from Lyne’s Renton, Washington, home with several of her body parts, including her head, one of her arms and hand, and her lower leg and foot. He dumped the body parts in Seattle homeowner’s recycling bin. The homeowner found the body parts the next day. When police arrived, they noticed that the remains were fresh, and sealed in plastic bags. The prosecutor in the case made the following statement.

“It appears she was murdered in (her) home and transported in her own car.”

Lyne was reported missing on Saturday morning when she failed to answer the door when her ex-husband dropped off their three children. After police arrived at the home, they noticed human tissue and bone fragments in the bathtub. Charlton was taken in for questioning, and detained until authorities could positively identify the human remains as Lyne’s.

Once Lyne’s remains were formally identified, and Charlton was charged with first-degree murder. He was also charged with grand theft auto, after Lyne’s grey 2015 Toyota Highlander was found in the Seattle area on Monday night. He’s being held at a Seattle jail on a $2 million bond.

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Charlton has a history of criminal behavior, some of which caused his own parents to take out a temporary restraining order on him in 2006. According to court documents, Charlton became extremely angry when drunk and threatened his parents to the point where they didn’t feel safe around him.

Allegedly, he once pulled a copy of the Hannibal DVD (a movie about a serial killer who eats human parts) from a shelf and told his mother to “watch and beware.” He also reportedly told his parents that “life was putting too much pressure on him” and he felt he was becoming emotionally and mentally unstable.

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Lynne is remembered by friends and family as friendly, outgoing, and trusting. Her trusting nature may have played a part in how she met Charlton when she took a chance and started chatting with him online. However, her friends want the public to know that they had formed what was considered a trusting relationship when the murder happened. She had already been on several other dates with him and saw no red flags.

Her friends now hope to help others by warning them to take precautions with people they date. Friend Nancy Sivitilli offered her perspective.

“I think the message I want to get out to people – other than what phenomenal person Ingrid is – is don’t ever go out with a guy without telling your friends and telling the guy, ‘My friends know I’m out with you. They have your name. Take a picture. Tell him, ‘If you’re not afraid then you shouldn’t be afraid of me taking a picture of you.’ Tell your friends what the plan is, where you’re going, a timeline. Do a check-in.”

On Tuesday night, family, friends, and even supporters who didn’t personally know Ingrid Lyne attended a prayer vigil for her at Seattle’s St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church. The event included a march from the church to her Renton home.

[Photo by Montana Department of Corrections]