Dasani Water Recall? Hoax Claims Clear Parasite Worm Found In Coca-Cola Product

Those who love Dasani bottled water can rest assured that no gross-looking clear parasite worms are lurking in their Dasani water bottles. Horrible-looking photos of clear parasite worms are circulating — along with claims that the clear worms were found inside of Dasani water product — and they are sending gross thoughts throughout social media. At least that’s the reaction of those who believe the hoax story, with thoughts of a clear worm being easily swallowed from a Dasani water product, since the clear parasite wouldn’t necessarily be easy to see. However, the report of worms found in Dasani water is a lie.

As reported by Lead Stories in the article titled, “Hoax! Coca-Cola DID NOT Recall Dasani Water After Clear Parasite Worm Was Found In Bottles Across U.S.,” a rumor began spreading on Wednesday, April 13, that Dasani water products were being recalled due to some gross-looking parasite worms that are clear being found in the Dasani water.

The original hoax article, titled “Coca-Cola Recalls Dasani Water After Clear Parasite Worm Was Found In Bottles Across U.S.,” was published on a website called Healthy Life Land.

With nearly 150,000 followers on the Healthy Life Land Facebook page, it’s easy to see why the post claiming that “Coca-Cola Recalls Dasani Water After Clear Parasite Worm Was Found In Bottles Across U.S.” would spread to so quickly online.

Twitter already reports “Dasani parasite” as a suggestion when Twitter users type the word “Dasani” into their search engine, proving that folks are already concerned about the false report of a Dasani water recall. And it is no wonder they are concerned, because the hoax report claims a major recall happened due to the parasite.

“If you purchase/drink Dasani water you might want to listen up. There has been a major recall by the Coca-Cola company today after several thousand bottles of their drinking water was found to be contaminated with a parasite. It has sent several hundred people to the hospital and is responsible for parasitic symptoms such as fever, rash, vomiting and stomach bloating.”

The fake report goes on to say that Coca-Cola admitted Dasani is merely tap water that has been purified. With claims that Dasani is merely tap water in a fancy bottle, it was an easy stretch for the fake report to then create the hoax and claim that Dasani contained parasites, and therefore necessitated boiling the Dasani water first.

“Even though the majority of the impurities have admittedly been removed from Dasani water, and minerals added back in, these parasites have somehow worked their way into their supposedly“clean” water system which has been passed on to the consumer. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has shut down the manufacturing facility and issued a major recall on the brand. Do not drink this water! The FDA is recommending that if you have no choice but to consume the water, you MUST boil the water first to kill the parasite. Otherwise, it will host itself in your stomach lining and intestine and breed offsprings.”

With false claims that several thousand bottles of Dasani drinking water were discovered to have parasites, and an official-looking “News 4” image that actually contained a photo of a clear baby eel — and not a clear parasite from a Dasani water bottle, the report is troubling.

By right-clicking on the image contained in the fake report of the Dasani water recall and choosing “Search Google for image,” users can discover that the image has been used before, and shows up in the below YouTube video uploaded on December 26, 2014, which warns users about eel larvae showing up in tap or stream water that isn’t boiled.

What are shown in the pictures are called Transparent Eel Larvae. Be careful if you are drinking from tap or stream water without boiling it. This is an animal living in water who is poisonous to humans and other warm blooded animals. So be careful before drinking water. And please boil your water before drinking.

Therefore, it’s easy to see how the fake Dasani recall parasite story was inspired and how it grew legs.

[Casey Rodgers / AP Images for Dasani]