Hillary Clinton Is Likely To Get Away With ‘Emailgate’ Scandal, FBI Has Yet To Find Evidence She Intentionally Broke The Law

Hillary Clinton may be leading the Democratic primaries, but she is far from being off the hook as far as her email scandal is concerned. A comprehensive article in The Washington Post summed up the details surrounding her use of a private email server during her tenure as Secretary of State, revealing that the FBI is pulling strings to speed up the investigation.

The article, which tackled whether Clinton broke the law and if she really risked the security of the United States, also stated that a few dozen FBI agents are now involved in the investigation.

“The FBI has accelerated the investigation because officials want to avoid the possibility of announcing any action too close to the election,” the article read.

According to other reports, the FBI wants to end the investigation before the presidential elections in November. Legal experts are also predicting that Clinton is likely to get away with her email scandal since the use of a private email server was not forbidden; apparently, it is common practice among other secretaries to use private accounts and servers.

However, the issue has remained a source of controversy, and it is ruining her campaign. This is one of the reasons voters find her untrustworthy. She has repeatedly claimed that she never knowingly sent or received classified documents through her personal server during her term as Secretary of State. However, investigations revealed there were several classified items on her government server that went through her private server.

More than 2,000 of the emails she submitted to the State Department contained classified information, and 22 of the messages were considered to contain information deemed too sensitive to even release at all, reports say.

Clinton’s camp claims that the former Secretary of State “was at worst a passive recipient of unwitting information that subsequently became deemed as classified.” However, according to a Washington Post report, over 100 of the classified items on her server were written by Hillary Clinton herself, contradicting her camp’s claim that she was only a “passive recipient.”

An official memo that circulated under Hillary Clinton’s name reportedly warned State Department employees to “avoid conducting official Department business from their personal email accounts” for security reasons.

Clinton did release half the emails that passed through her server to the State Department 10 months after her term ended, although she did not surrender the rest, as she claimed they were personal emails, clearly defying her own memo.

She was also informed in another memo entitled, “Use of BlackBerries in Mahogany Row” that using a personal BlackBerry was not a good idea, as it could be transformed into a listening device.

“Any unclassified Blackberry is highly vulnerable in any setting to remotely and covertly monitoring conversations, retrieving e-mails, and exploiting calendars,” Assistant Secretary for Diplomatic Security Eric Boswell indicated in the memo.

Clinton allegedly told Boswell that she had read the memo and “gets it,” based on an email sent by a senior diplomatic security official. Despite the memo, she still continued using her personal BlackBerry.

State Department security specialists said they had no idea that Hillary Clinton was using a private personal server, and as such, they did not take any action to protect the server against “intruders and spies.” Her server also reportedly did not get standard encryption protection until March 29, 2009 — two months after Clinton started using it.

Without encryption, anyone could have accessed her communications, a potentially huge security issue.

Did Hillary Clinton break the law? Even if she did not intentionally break the law, her actions surely put national security at risk, considering the fact that she knew about the ramifications of using a personal BlackBerry connected to a private email server for her State Department business. Still, there is no concrete evidence to prove that she knowingly sent or received classified materials at the time.

[Image by Spencer Platt, Getty Images]