Zika Virus May Be Linked To Microcephaly, CDC Confirms 9 U.S. Cases Of Zika

Jessica Reveles

The mosquito-borne Zika virus continues to spread in affected and now unaffected countries; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed nine cases of Zika among pregnant women in the United States and health officials are currently investigating 10 additional suspected cases. All 19 U.S. residents had traveled to Zika affected areas.

According to NBC News:

"Five of the nine affected babies or fetuses have either miscarried or shown evidence of birth defects.

Two of the pregnancies with the virus, which is suspected of causing severe birth defects, have ended in miscarriage, two more were aborted, and one baby was born with severe microcephaly. Two babies were born healthy, the CDC reported, and two women are still pregnant with apparently healthy babies."

Two of the pregnancies with the virus, which is suspected of causing severe birth defects, have ended in miscarriage, two more were aborted, and one baby was born with severe microcephaly. Two babies were born healthy, the CDC reported, and two women are still pregnant with apparently healthy babies."

— UNICEF (@UNICEF) March 6, 2016

— HHS.gov (@HHSGov) March 6, 2016

Now the CDC is also cautioning men returning from Zika affected areas as it has recently become clear that the virus can be transmitted sexually via vaginal or anal intercourse and oral sex. NBC News reported:

"CDC also detailed several cases of sexual transmission of Zika. All involved a man who had traveled to a Zika-affected area and had unprotected sex with a woman while he had symptoms, such as a rash or fever."

— UNICEF (@UNICEF) March 6, 2016

— United Nations (@UN) March 1, 2016

[Photo by Felipe Dana/AP Images]

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