Dr. Samir Chachoua: Doctor Who Injected Himself With Charlie Sheen’s Blood Claims He Cured HIV With Goat Milk

Dr. Samir Chachoua injected himself with Charlie Sheen’s blood because he was so confident that this goat milk treatment and vaccine can cure HIV. The controversial Australian doctor, who lives in Mexico, has been called a quack many times, but he appeared on the Bill Maher’s show to explain his HIV and cancer treatments with the world anyway.

Dr. Chachoua vaccinated himself against HIV and staunchly maintains that after injecting himself with Charlie Sheen’s blood, he remains disease free. In 2001, NBC aired a segment touting the doctor’s advancements and successes in the search for a cure, the International Wellness Directory notes. The broadcast shared the stories of several patients who said they were responding very well to the treatment until it was unceremoniously yanked away from them without explanation.

Charlie Sheen’s doctor claims the government is attempting to keep the cure hidden away from the public for some unknown reason. During the Bill Maher interview, Dr. Samir Chachoua stated that multiple attempts had been made on his life, including an incident with a car bomb.

The alternative treatment was reportedly based on using milk from arthritic goats. According to Dr. Chachoua, the CAEV virus in the goat milk “destroys HIV and protects people who drink it for life.”

In an attempt to prove that his vaccines and treatments worked and were a viable alternative to traditional Western medicine, Dr. Chachoua traveled around the world and offered to give a half million dollars to anyone who could validate or disprove his claims. The doctor ultimately connected with Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and they reportedly created a test program with the doctor’s vaccines.

Dr. Chachoua said he had to agree to turn over all of his research and treatment-related material before the test program could begin. He said he readily complied because he felt the reputable hospital was genuinely interested in testing his cure. The doctor reports that Cedars-Sinai had a 99 percent success rate when using his vaccine and deemed the treatment an “exciting new world of therapeutic opportunity.”

Cedars-Sinai denied ever having a relationship with Dr. Chachoua or testing his HIV vaccine after some deaths occurred at a Mexican clinic claiming to be associated with the doctor. Chachoua filed a federal lawsuit against the respected research facility for denying the testing had occurred and that patients had experienced success — and won.

Charlie Sheen, 50, went off his cocktail of antiviral drugs, which are designed to suppress HIV, and tried Dr. Chachoua’s controversial and experimental vaccine during a trip to Mexico, the Daily Mail reports.

A week after stopping his HIV treatment and trying the goat milk cure, Sheen said he felt great and did not care about claims that he was risking his life by switching to the alternative treatment.

“Am I risking my life? So what? I was born dead. That part of it doesn’t phase me at all,” Sheen said. “I’m presenting myself as a type of guinea pig.”

“It’s a horrible way to live, all these side effects disappeared the minute he [Charlie Sheen] started my therapy and the minute he started my therapy, his liver went to normal levels,” Dr. Chachoua claimed. “Even the charts they held up on our show, all the great tests they showed, they were during my treatment, not theirs.”

During another sit down with Dr. Oz, Sheen was forced to admit that after stepping away from the prescribed cocktail of drugs, his HIV numbers are now “back up.” Charlie said that after taking the goat milk treatment, he checked his blood every week, and HIV had been non-detectable until the presence of the disease in his body suddenly increased.

“I’m amazed that I’m actually alive,” Sheen told Dr. Oz when discussing how his health has fluctuated since going off of the traditional course of treatment for HIV.

What do you think about Dr. Chachoua’s goats milk HIV cure claims and the Charlie Sheen admissions to Dr. Oz?

[Image via Helga Esteb/Shutterstock.com]