Illinois Lottery To Start Paying Winners Who Win $600 Or More Again

Illinois Lottery winners can now rejoice. According to NBC Chicago, the Illinois Lottery will once again start paying winners who have won more than $600 in the lottery. Previously, the Illinois Lottery made the news because payments had been on hold to certain lottery winners since July 1, as reported by the Inquisitr.

As reported by the San Diego Tribune, sales of Illinois Lottery tickets went down after the state said they would delay paying people who won more than $600 due to the state budget problems. The announcement about the delay for $600 and up winners came in mid-October, sending Illinois Lottery ticket sales downward, and Illinois Lottery players across state lines to buy tickets.

Months ago, the Chicago Tribune had reported that Illinois Lottery payments experienced troubles because of Illinois budget issues. Back then, it was claimed that payments to only those Illinois Lottery winners who had won more than $25,000 in the lottery were on hold.

However, NBC Chicago now reports that even some folks who had won less than $25,000 weren’t getting paid – including those who won $600 or more in the Illinois Lottery. That’s likely a lot larger group of Illinois Lottery winners who had been waiting on the state to pay out their lottery winnings than first expected.

“Payments to several lottery winners have been delayed since July 1 due to the budget impasse in Springfield. Only prizes under $600 could be collected.”

A new law signed by Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner on Monday, December 7, has made the difference. The bill has been a boon to Illinois Lottery winners who can collect the money owed them – because it offers the legal right for the Illinois Lottery to resume paying out prizes.

When can Illinois Lottery winners expect to get paid? Well, those who’ve already submitted their claim forms will have to wait for the state of Illinois to process that paperwork on a first come, first serve basis, say Illinois Lottery officials.

That gives Illinois Lottery officials a good seven days since the announcement on Monday to start processing new winning Illinois Lottery claims, starting on December 14.

The news is likely great to hear for Illinois Lottery winners like Susan Rick, whose $250,000 Illinois Lottery winning jackpot that Rick’s boyfriend won got them an IOU instead of immediate payment, as reported by the Chicago Tribune. Susan and her boyfriend were promised by Illinois state officials that they would receive their Illinois Lottery winnings when the state budget’s impasse was overcome.

When news of Danny Chasteen’s delayed Illinois Lottery winnings of $250,000, as reported by WGN, went viral online, the Illinois Lottery was forced to address the delay.

“Due to the ongoing budget situation in Springfield, some lottery winner payments have been delayed. All winners will be paid in full as soon as the Lottery and the Illinois Comptroller have the legislative authority to do so. Currently, winners may claim prizes under $600 at any of our 8,000 retail locations, and prizes under $25,000 may be claimed at any Lottery claims center, found at illinoislottery.com.”

The Illinois Lottery has been unique in a number of ways, such as being the first state to let Illinois Lottery tickets be purchased via an app, as reported by the Chicago Tribune. Geo-targeting within the state of Illinois made that online lottery-ticket buying possible.

Now that the Illinois Lottery is once again paying out winners, the Illinois Lottery app might experience plenty more downloads from lottery winner hopefuls.

Acting Director B.R. Lane relayed how the resumption of paying out Illinois Lottery winners should help those industries that benefit from the revenue that the Illinois Lottery provides.

“It allows the Illinois Lottery to fully return to the business of supporting education, capital projects, and select charitable causes throughout the state. We are excited to be back and look forward to a revitalized experience for our players.”

[Photo by Paul Beaty, File/AP Photo]