Film Of JFK Assassination Lawsuit – Woman Sues U.S. Govt. For ‘Misplaced’ Footage Which Could Prove ‘Second Gunman’ Conspiracy Theory

A woman has filed a lawsuit for a film of the late U.S. president John F. Kennedy’s assassination. She is demanding that the film be returned or that she be paid compensation for “misplacing” one of the few recordings of the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while riding in his motorcade.

A woman whose grandfather shot a video that inadvertently recorded the assassination of President John F Kennedy – a video believed to be in the possession of the U.S. government – is suing the government. She has demanded that either the film be returned to her or that she be paid $10 million in compensation, reported The Guardian.

Gayle Nix Jackson, a resident of Fort Worth area has sued a federal agency to the tune of $10 million for the return of a film shot by her grandfather. The home video, shot in an amateur manner, shows a portion of the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Gayle filed the lawsuit in federal court on Saturday, November 21. Sunday, the 22nd of November, was the 52nd anniversary of Kennedy’s death.

Gayle’s grandfather Orville Nix shot the video on November 22, 1963. As the news spread about the assassination, Orville sold his film to the UPI news agency for $5,000. It is believed Orville had an understanding with the news agency that the film would be returned after 25 years. However, that did not happen. Instead, there are conflicting reports about how many times the film changed hands. But according to Fox News, the film was obtained by the Warren Commission and another federal panel that investigated the shooting and assassin Lee Harvey Oswald.

Through various agencies that were investigating JFK’s assassination, the film is believed to have eventually landed in the possession of the government for the House Select Committee on Assassinations in 1978. Unfortunately, this is where the official trail and records end. Gayle claims in her lawsuit that the National Archives reported to the family this year that the government did not have the original film or a chain of possession for it, reported Philly.

The lawsuit claims that the Warren Commission had deemed the Nix film to be as important, if not more, as the Zapruder film. However, the suit claims the public is mainly unaware of its significance.

Abraham Zapruder’s film on the JFK assassination is widely considered as the most prominent of recordings. In fact, the federal government back in 1999 had paid a handsome fee of $16 million to Zapruder’s heirs for the film. While Zapruder was shooting his film from across the street, Orville was filming from Dealey Plaza.

Interestingly, Orville filmed the presidential motorcade as it entered the plaza. However, he was oblivious to what he actually managed to capture on film. It was later, when the photo lab that processed his film informed him about the significance of his film, that he was made aware of the significance of the film.

The lawsuit claims that the film shows a bullet striking the president, first lady Jackie Kennedy climbing onto the trunk of the limousine, and Secret Service agent Clint Hill jumping onto the vehicle. Besides capturing the actual assassination, the film could shed light on the speculation about a possible second gunman besides Oswald.

The video offers a complete opposite perspective from the Zapruder film. If the two films are compared side-by-side, they could indicate if there was indeed a second gunman who was either working with Oswald or served as a secondary marksman, should Oswald miss.

Farris Rookstool III, who says he helped the family obtain a duplicate of the FBI’s copy of the film, and who in turn promptly handed it over to the Sixth Floor Museum, said:

“The film is a mirror image of the Zapruder film from the other side of Dealey plaza.”

Could the eight-millimeter film, which was taken from the opposite side of the president’s limousine from where the Zapruder film was shot, prove what the conspiracy theorists have claimed all along?

[Photo by Underwood & Underwood/Underwood Archives/Getty Images]