Obama Cautions About Overreaction To Paris Attacks – ‘They’re A Bunch Of Killers With Good Social Media,’ He Says About ISIS

American President Barack Obama has cautioned against overreaction to the Paris attacks. Assuring the people that ISIS, the militant group that orchestrated the barbaric acts, “can’t strike a mortal blow against the U.S.,” Obama added that America will destroy the terrorist organization.

Reassuring Americans, President Barack Obama said Sunday that ISIS “cannot strike a mortal blow” against the nation. However, he added that Americans shouldn’t overreact to the Paris attacks, as that would be playing right into the extremists’ hands.

Despite exuding a calm composure, Obama sounded determined when he vowed, “We will destroy this terrorist organization.”

ISIS had recently issued a direct threat to America. After releasing a video that warned of attacks on Russia, the terror group posted a couple of videos on its social media accounts that threatened America and broadly targeted Washington D.C., as well as a few other prominent cities. Though he did not dismiss the threats outright, President Obama urged citizens to remain strong and not give in to fear.

“We do not succumb to fear. The most powerful tool we have to fight ISIL is to say that we’re not afraid, to not elevate them, to somehow buy into their fantasy that they’re doing something important.”

Before the videos threatening Russia, America, and “other countries” engaged in the battle against the ISIS in Syria, the terrorist organization claimed responsibility for downing a Russian passenger jet over Egypt’s Sinai desert. Although Russia had initially dismissed the claims, investigators later concluded that the plane was ripped apart from a crude Improvised explosive Device (IED) planted in the passenger area.

After the plane crash came the attacks on Paris, which involved a small number of terrorists targeting public places to spread terror and mayhem. About 130 innocent civilians lost their lives in the Paris attacks. Exactly a week after, the ISIS militants targeted a luxury hotel in Mali. Two terrorists managed to overtake the hotel and hold more than 170 hostages. The terrorists killed 19 hostages, mostly foreigners, before being killed by Malian commandos.

Obama Cautions About Overreaction To Paris Attacks
[Photo by Habibou Kouyate/Getty Images]

Such incidents are bound to instill fear in the hearts and minds of ordinary citizens. After the Paris attacks, Obama’s strategy has come under repeated questioning, reported the Financial Express. Notwithstanding the criticism, Obama dismissed ISIS’ implied global prowess and refused to justify the notion of an existential threat saying,

“They’re a bunch of killers with good social media. IS can’t beat us on the battlefield, so they try to terrorize us into being afraid.”

Russian President Vladimir Putin had recently appealed for global cooperation in combating terrorism. His appeal came after the Mali attacks in which six Russian government officials lost their lives.

Perhaps reiterating what Putin said, Obama added, “I think it is absolutely vital for every country, every leader, to send a signal that the viciousness of a handful of killers does not stop the world from doing vital business.”

The world leaders are expected to meet in Paris this week for climate talks. Although Paris was attacked less than a fortnight ago, the White House has stayed firm on the long-scheduled plans and insists the talks will talk place in Paris, reported ABC News. Perhaps the Obama administration intends to prove the world isn’t succumbing to fear, and any change of venue at this stage could signal America is overreacting.

As the world gears up to combat the ISIS threat, Obama’s response may appear to be tepid. However, the American president, with the cooperation of other world leaders, has significantly stepped up his offensive against ISIS. Even if the terror group is targeting cities to spread terror, Obama has urged everyone not to be afraid and, more specifically, not to overreact.

[Photo by Saul Loeb/Getty Images]