Early ‘Anonymous’ Klu Klux Klan Leak Disavowed: The Confused World Of Hacktivism

anonymous KKK

Hacktivist collective Anonymous’ Klu Klux Klan doxing, planned for November 5, has suffered what could be seen as a setback. An online activist using the name Amped Attacks released a list on pastebin purporting to consist of a collection of political figures associated with the Klu Klux Klan. Anonymous initially celebrated the leak on Twitter, but later backpedaled as the politicians concerned began to push back with credible reasons as to why they could not possibly be involved with the KKK. Anonymous’ Twitter account hurriedly published tweets pointing out that no posts prior to the #operationkkk launch of November 5 could be verified or endorsed by the group.

anonymous KKK

“I got the information from several KKK websites when I [hacked] them and was able to dump their database. I went through many emails that was signed up with these sites.”

Which all sounds reasonable enough, but there are a couple of problems with this approach. Subscribing to an email list is not necessarily evidence of affiliation with a group. It is standard practice, for example, for investigators, journalists and some government employees to sign up to all manner of websites as part of the monitoring certain groups. There is also the well-known practice of more or less subversive or underground websites initially hiding themselves as something else in order to garner subscriptions. A case in point is ultra-right wing group, Britain First, which reportedly presents itself in email and Facebook campaigns as a veterans’ support group.

anonymous KKK

The net effect of this early revelation, despite the streams of casual support for the initial effort, is likely to be a further erosion of Anonymous’ Klu Klux Klan operation. The errors of “citizen enforcers” like those reported in the New Yorker as outing the wrong police officer in connection with the Michael Brown shooting, will always be squarely attributed to the Anonymous collective as if the group were, in fact, a single unit. Just like the Occupy movement, Anonymous appears to be a victim of its own decentralization and the leaderless model favored by many groups on the left and far left of politics.

anonymous KKK

[Photo by Getty Images/Spencer Platt]