When Does Daylight Saving Time End? Don't Forget To Do These 4 Things

Antonio J. Newell

It's that time of year already? Time for everyone to "fall back" and enjoy an extra hour of rest, right? You need to be ready, and here are four things to remember.

Briefly, before the preparation tips, it should be pointed out that "daylight savings time" is actually "daylight saving time." According to CNN, it's a common usage error that has been adopted over the years.

Standard Time also states that daylight saving was introduced in World War I as a means to utilize more natural light and minimize that of artificial necessity. Hence, "saving daylight," whether in early morning or late afternoon. So, another way you can look at it is "daylight saving's time."

Yet, to digress, the date for 2015 is Sunday, November 1, at 2 a.m. While sometimes there is confusion concerning the concept, you are to set your clocks backward an hour. A way of remembering this technique is by the seasons. In autumn, simply "fall back" an hour. In spring, "spring forth" an hour.

Interestingly enough, there's a petition in motion to cease daylight saving time. It can be found on Petition 2 Congress. Currently, the issue has over 68,000 supportive letters. At the site, it mentions as follows.

"Please stop the messing with our schedules. It's an antiquated practice that only aggravates people. As it is Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and America Samoa do not participate in this practice."

Nevertheless, Standard Time notes a proposal to end daylight saving altogether for the United States. On its website, it mentions as follows.

"It has not escaped our notice that in the United States, Eastern standard time is the same as Central daylight time and Mountain standard time is the same as Pacific Daylight Time. Thus, we propose that The Pacific and Central time zones remain on permanent daylight saving time, and that the Mountain and Eastern time zones remain on permanent standard time.

"In addition to releasing us from the burden of having to set our clocks every few months, this will also reduce the number of time zones in the United States from four to two."

"In addition to releasing us from the burden of having to set our clocks every few months, this will also reduce the number of time zones in the United States from four to two."

[Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images News]

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