A Miley Cyrus Song Nearly Ruined These Air Force Pilots’ Careers

If you’re an Air Force pilot and if you listen to Miley Cyrus, then you may not want to text the lyrics. Or, maybe, you shouldn’t mention her music at all.

It turns out that listening to Miley Cyrus can cost you your career. Top U.S. Air Force officials are currently investigating to see if the punishment for simply texting one of Cyrus’ songs about the party drug Molly was too harsh. Three Air Force pilot instructors at the Laughlin Air Force Base in Texas have been grounded. In addition, their careers could end after investigators noticed the word “Molly” was in their text messages.

According to a report via the Air Force Times, the pilots’ commanders Col. Brian Hastings have stripped them of their wings. He also issued the three pilots letters of reprimand. A fourth pilot was released during an Article 15 hearing. The pilots were punished because their text messages were deemed unprofessional. The Air Force Office of Special Investigations did not find any concrete evidence that the pilots were using drugs. In addition, all four pilots have passed drug tests.

U.S. Air Force

The pilots, who were not identified, claimed that they were texting lyrics from rap and pop songs that include the word “Molly,” just like Miley Cyrus’ hit song “We Can’t Stop.” Lawmakers wrote to Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh on Sept. 15 saying that the text messages for which the three pilots were punished contained “song lyrics, movie lines, and other obvious cultural references that seem to have been painfully misunderstood by investigators.”

But the Air Force wants to take this matter seriously, spokesperson Lt. Col. Christopher Karns wrote in an email to the Air Force Times on Oct. 17.

“At the request of the Air Force Chief of Staff, the Air Force Inspector General has begun an inquiry of the investigative process and the procedures used to administer any adverse personnel actions. Upon completion of the IG Inquiry, a general officer will independently review the final adjudication and resulting outcome of each member’s administrative case.”

It’s not just the Air Force that has a problem with Miley Cyrus’ music and drug references. Both the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Parents Television Council (PTC) have a problem with the “Doooo It” singer as well. Back in September, after she hosted the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards, the FCC received complaints when Cyrus accidentally showed her nipple backstage during the live show. According to the documents, viewers also had problems with Cyrus’ “obscene” costumes and inappropriate words like “horny.”

Miley Cyrus

Miley Cyrus’ hosting gig on the MTV VMAs didn’t set well with the Parents Television Council. The group blasted both Miley and MTV for being so laxed over the nip-slip.

“Are we surprised that Miley Cyrus exposed herself to millions of viewers, and to more people who will inevitably see the news in the mainstream media? About as surprised as we’ll be if the sun rises in the east tomorrow morning. We had hoped she would have proven us wrong and demonstrate her considerable talent as a performer, rather than rely on her own sexuality to entertain the audience.”

Miley spent most of her time on the live broadcast wearing barely-there costumes and joking about her love for marijuana. The PTC also accused MTV of being irresponsible for choosing a controversial figure to host a show that’s watched by kids.

The FCC has decided not to fine MTV for the for the live broadcast, especially since cable channels are held to different standards than network stations, according to a previous report via PEOPLE. As for the PTC, it looks like MTV has not responded to their complaints about Miley Cyrus.

The “Wrecking Ball” singer has been open about her sexuality, her drug use, and her reasons for running around naked. But simply watching or enjoying Cyrus’ music and antics sure has its costs.

What are your thoughts? Do you think Miley Cyrus is a bad influence? Share your thoughts below in the comments section.

[Photo by Jonathan Leibson/Getty Images for SVEDKA Vodka]