Selfie-Obsessed Sorority Mocked At Baseball Game, Get Celeb Pic With Diamondbacks

Selfies: Hate them or love them, but can you honestly say you’ve never taken one? The digital self-portraits have become the form of expression for kids of an entire generation who take to social media to broadcast their lives. From the “I woke up like this” and bikini shots, to the funny animals and celebrities, everything is seemingly acceptable when it comes to taking a selfie.

So much so that safety, privacy, and copyright concerns are finally catching up with the phenomenon. Justin Bieber recently asked his fans to be more respectful when approaching him for selfies, they were announced as “deadlier than sharks,” and the selfie stick was banned from this year’s Emmy Awards due to safety concerns.

Maybe we’re all vain in this digital age, but with more than a million selfies posted to social media each day, the phenomenon is far from going away. But not everyone shares the selfie passion, as a group of sorority girls found out Wednesday.

Attending a Diamondbacks-Rockies baseball game, the Arizona State University’s Alpha Chi Omega sisters were caught on camera taking pictures of themselves having fun, eating hot dogs, and generally ignoring the outside world — and were brutally mocked by the sports commentators.

The two announcers, whose video you can watch above, are heard commenting on the action with words such as “Do you have to make faces when you take selfies?” and “I can’t even get my phone to take pictures.”

One of the broadcasters even tweeted one of the food selfies posted that night.

If you are watching @FOXSPORTSAZ#Dbacks tonight, here is one of the selfies. pic.twitter.com/TLyVwGm9Xg

— Steve Berthiaume (@BertDbacks) October 1, 2015

Ironically, the commentators were also encouraging fans to tweet and share their own photos that night, with a hashtag. Hypocritical much?

But it wasn’t all sarcasm and mockery for the friends, who were asked by the Arizona Diamondbacks themselves to take a selfie at the end of the night! Who’s laughing now?

And it looks like the girls took it well too, one of them taking to Twitter to let her mother know she “made it.”

So what do you think? Are selfies just a vain expression of our narcissism enabled by pervasive technologies or a real way of showing our true selves? Actor James Franco — nicknamed the selfie king for the huge amount of selfies he posts on his Instagram — defended his habit in the New York Times a couple of years ago.

“I’m actually turned off when I look at an account and don’t see any selfies, because I want to know who I’m dealing with,” he said. “In our age of social networking, the selfie is the new way to look someone right in the eye and say, ‘Hello this is me.'”

And Franco is not alone, many celebrities and politicians have embraced the trend and allowed the public to take up close pictures with them. From the Pope to Queen Elizabeth II, we’ve compiled the best celeb selfies below.

[Screenshot courtesy of 120 Sports]