Swiss Launch Investigation Regarding Alleged Criminal Activity Of Sepp Blatter, FIFA Soccer Head

ITV reports Sepp Blatter is accused of "criminal mismanagement... [and ]... suspicion of misappropriation" and has therefore had his office raided for evidence related to the ongoing FIFA corruption scandal. The areas concerned, specifically, are dealings with UEFA chief Michel Platini, including an alleged $2 million dollar payment. The focus of attention is wider than just Blatter.

"FIFA says the Swiss Attorney General has carried out interviews and gathered documents at the world football governing body's headquarters in Zurich."
According to the office of the attorney general (OAG), raids were carried out on the office of Blatter and documents and evidence seized. The dominoes are falling in what has been presented by a U.K. Reuters source as a great conspiracy of the upper management of FIFA in economically salacious activities. Jerome Valcke, Blatter's right-hand man, is alleged to have committed ticket sale fraud during the 2014 World Cup in Brazil and was subsequently suspended, though he continues to deny any wrongdoing.

So what has led up to all this and what impact does this have on world soccer?

SURREY, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO - JUNE 11: Former FIFA vice-president Jack Warner waits to be introduced to speak during an Independent Liberal Party community meeting on June 11, 2015 in Surrey, Trinidad And Tobago. Mr. Warner at the request of US authorities, faces extradition to the United States on charges of corruption and money laundering related to FIFA, Warner has continued to deny any wrongdoing.
SURREY, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO - JUNE 11: Former FIFA vice-president Jack Warner waits to be introduced to speak during an Independent Liberal Party community meeting on June 11, 2015 in Surrey, Trinidad And Tobago. Mr. Warner at the request of US authorities, faces extradition to the United States on charges of corruption and money laundering related to FIFA, Warner has continued to deny any wrongdoing.

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 29: Aaron Davidson, a sports marketing executive from Florida, leaves a Brooklyn court house with his lawyer after pleading not guilty on Friday to conspiracy and other charges resulting from the FIFA corruption scandal on May 29, 2015 in New York City. Since the case was announced earlier this week, Davidson is the first defendant to be arraigned in a U.S. court.
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 29: Aaron Davidson, a sports marketing executive from Florida, leaves a Brooklyn court house with his lawyer after pleading not guilty on Friday to conspiracy and other charges resulting from the FIFA corruption scandal on May 29, 2015 in New York City. Since the case was announced earlier this week, Davidson is the first defendant to be arraigned in a U.S. court.

The indictment of 14 total officials indicates that the corruption in FIFA is "rampant, systemic and deep-rooted," according to U.S. attorney general Loretta Lynch at her press conference following the arrests.

The scale of bribes and kickbacks -- spanning generations -- has been exposed and the meticulous investigation by the authorities is uncovering enough evidence not only to make the accusations, but to prosecute and jail parties that are found guilty.

The following are the names of those already arrested: Rafael Esquivel, Nicolas Leoz, Jeffrey Webb, Jack Warner, Eduardo Li, Eugenio Figueredo, and Jose Maria Marin.

The raiding of Blatter's office, however, signals that there is no stopping how far the investigation is willing to go to expose all of those people -- no matter their prior power and influence -- who participated in the corruption culture of FIFA. There is now no one higher up to investigate, but the extent of corruption is yet to be established.Blatter's official FIFA biography reads that he has had a position in FIFA since 1975, when he became Technical Director. He became General Secretary in 1981 and in 1998 became the FIFA president. With the latest Swiss move, the reputation of FIFA as a credible organization is in serious doubt as the implications of such malfeasance are incalculable.

[Photo by Ethan Miller, Spencer Platt and Joe Raedle / Getty Images]