Hurricane Season 2015 Predictions: Tropical Storm Fred’s Path Avoids A Florida Forecast?

Hurricane Season 2015 Predictions: Tropical Storm Fred's Path Avoids A Florida Forecast?

The latest 2015 hurricane season predictions have Hurricane Fred weakening to Tropical Storm Fred, but do these 2015 predictions include a forecast which will affect Florida’s coasts?

In a related report by the Inquisitr, three simultaneous hurricanes inside the Pacific Ocean set a new record during the 2015 hurricane season.

Brian McNoldy of the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science notes that even if Tropical Storm Fred does not become Hurricane Fred that it was still a noteworthy hurricane.

“Fred has weakened to a 45mph tropical storm and is quickly on the way to becoming a remnant low. The Big 3 environmental factors for tropical cyclone intensity (sea surface temperature, wind shear, and low-level humidity) are all plunging into ranges that have caused Fred to quickly dissipate. All that remains is a low-level swirl northwest of the Cape Verde Islands. Although it was a short lifetime, it was the easternmost Cape Verde hurricane on record, which is certainly noteworthy.”

The latest update from the Nation Hurricane Center forecasts that Tropical Storm Fred may become a tropical depression by tomorrow.

“Maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (65 km/h) with higher gusts. Fred is encountering strong upper-level winds, so weakening is forecast, and the cyclone is likely to become a post-tropical low by tonight or Friday.”

Tropical Storm Fred’s path is currently taking it west-northwest at about nine miles per hour. This trajectory is expected to continue for the next several days, although NOAA also shows Tropical Storm Fred’s track taking it north by Sunday and then perhaps northeast by Monday.

Tropical Storm Fred Path Sept 3

Presuming these 2015 hurricane season predictions are accurate, Tropical Storm Fred should not threaten Florida or any part of the eastern coast of the United States.

[Image via NOAA]