Michigan Highway Sniper: Past Highway Shootings Cases Suggest A Difficult Investigation For Police

Michigan Highway Sniper: Past Highway Shootings Cases Suggest A Difficult Investigation For Police

Michigan is on the lookout for a possible highway sniper after several motorists along I-94 and I-69 have reported apparent bullet holes, but other cases of random highway shootings suggest that the case may not be easy to solve.

The incidents in Michigan stretch back more than a month, with the first reported case happening July 29. Police tied together reports from several motorists over the next three weeks that suggest a highway sniper could be shooting at cars along a busy corridor in the southern part of the state.

Police have already confirmed that one of the cars was damaged by a bullet, and said the other cases were likely from a weapon as well, CNN reported.

The alleged Michigan highway sniper does not appear to be following any particular pattern. Incidents have occurred both during the night and in broad daylight, and shots have come from different angles and struck different parts of cars. Police said they are not sure if the possible shooter is in a stationary location or in a moving car.

The incidents have led Michigan authorities to warn motorists about the possibly highway sniper, asking that they be aware of their surroundings and take caution.

WIN 98.5 noted.

“If you regularly drive those routes, you may want to inspect your car for damage.”

“Citizens living and driving near the highways should watch for cars parked in remote locations where they don’t belong, and report them.”

But history suggests that authorities will have difficulty in finding the possible Michigan highway sniper. There have been a number of other cases of people firing randomly at highways, with many stretching months or years with no resolution.

Michigan was caught in the grips of another highway sniper in 2012, with a series of attacks that the Associated Press noted put local residents on edge and forced school children to stay inside during recess. In that case authorities arrested Raulie Casteel, who was later convicted of the shootings, but other cases have gone unsolved for much longer.

In Ohio, a series of 24 sniper attacks took place on highways mostly around Columbus starting in 2003. The shootings went on for several months before authorities were finally able to arrest Charles McCoy Jr., who accepted a plea bargain in order to avoid the death sentence.

Other cases have gone unsolved. In the spring of 2014, a series of reported highway shootings took place around Rochester, New York. The shootings stopped in the summer, and police never identified a suspect.

Many of these cases brought difficulties in searching for suspects, especially those who shot from moving cars or quickly fled the scene.

In Michigan, several police agencies are working together to identify the possible highway sniper. They have not yet announced a suspect.

[Picture by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images]